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KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Number_6 posted:

Since the overall performance of all cars depends heavily on the tires, I'm kind of surprised there isn't a running thread (at least, that I could find) for this topic. We can discuss and debate the top tires in each category; the best "bang for the buck" tire in each category; etc. Race tires, summer tires, HP all-seasons, touring, winter, off road, etc. Goons can discuss their experience with their own personal choice of rubber. It could have a silly thread title like "Tires: Where the rubber meets the road" or "Steel-Belted Radial Insanity" or whatever.




To start off with, I'll ask AI's opinion on using summer performance tires for year round duty on a daily driver. For much of the '90s and early 2000s, I drove cars on summer tires like Goodyear Eagle GS-C or BFG KDW through the winter, without any real worries or problems. (In central Texas, there is rarely enough snow or ice on the road to matter...but it does get below freezing sometimes.) But summer tires now come with dire warnings about not using them when it's cold, even if it's dry. If you lived in a climate where it was warm most of the year, but had maybe 15 days a year below freezing would you go with the summer tire or settle for a good all-season?

15 days below freezing would probably be enough to persuade me not to run a summer tire, but I've almost always lived in places where it snows in the winter and thus have summer tires and winter tires.

I strongly disagree that winter tires only benefit you if other people have them. Yes, other people can still do stupid things, but you are better able to react to those stupid things, and you are less likely to do something stupid yourself. I used to run snow tires in NC since I had them anyway, and the two times a year that it was snowy and icy it was a massive benefit, even if other people did not have snow tires and were crashing all over the place like the idiots they were.

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KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




the PS4S is gods own tire

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




I have Goodyear Eagle F1s on the Focus ST and Michelin Pilot Sport 4S on the M5, and the Pilot Sports are vastly better tires in every circumstance I can find except maybe tire wear, but I will chalk up at least part of that to the fact that the M5 is a two ton fatty. The F1s firm up more in cold weather (~40) than the PS4s.

Aren't you in Indiana? I wouldn't bother with an all-season if you have a separate winter car. Just don't drive like a moron on the off chance it gets a little cold.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




LRADIKAL posted:

Do we do recommendations here?
I've got a 2019 Leaf e+ SL with OEM tires on it. I'm sure they're very efficient, but I'd like something better in the winter. Is the best plan to buy some winter tires + steel wheels and swap them onto the front during the season, or should I get softer all season (all weather?) tires to run all year? Sounds like we're talking about a 5 percent efficiency loss doing something like that all year?
I live in western Washington, so it's not generally too snowy, but black ice and soaked asphalt is very common. Also the tires on this thing definitely show off the limitations of front wheel drive on launch.


2019 NISSAN LEAF SL Tire Size: P215/50R17
https://weatherspark.com/y/842/Aver...ates-Year-Round

do not buy winter tires unless you buy all four

winter tires will reduce your range - kind of up to you. i think either OEM summer + winter tires is fine, or a well rated cold weather all season is probably fine. kind of depends on what type of driving you are doing.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




all tires are fine on dirt and gravel at the speeds you ought to be driving on dirt and gravel

you should be running 195-60-15s which is the stock size on the 99 impreza non WRX edition

For winter, General Altimax Arctics are good, and pretty inexpensive. But you'll pretty well be fine in your situation with anything that is cheap and from a name brand. Don't buy a hardo winter tire like the Hakkapeliitta.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




provided you can clear your brakes, going -1 or even -2 gets you a narrower, smaller diameter wheel for better performance and lower tire and wheel cost. I've usually gone -1.

I don't particularly trust used rims since it's hard to visually inspect for issues that will effect tire seating. i just bought new winter tires and new alloy wheels for a car for like 800 bucks from tire rack. not bad.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




BraveUlysses posted:

you end up decreasing the wheel diameter which is accommodated by increasing the sidewall height so that you end up with a wheel diameter that is very close to your original wheel diameter

this, essentially.

My Golf has default 17" wheels with 205/55 tires. When I put 16" wheels on for winter, they have 205/65 tires. The summer wheel has a total diameter of approximately 17 + 2(8.07 * 0.55) for a total diameter of 25.9". The winter wheel has a total diameter of approximately 16 + 2(8.07 * 0.65), total diameter of 26.5". It's a little off but it's not too far. I also don't mind the slight increase in ride height because ground clearance is nice in the snow.

Note that tires are expressed as a width (first number, mm) and the sidewall height as a percentage of the width. So a 205/55 has a shorter sidewall than a 215/55.

width matters more for contact patch than diameter.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




MrOnBicycle posted:

So I'm looking at buying a new car that has stock tire dimension of 215/55R17. Seems like it's a slightly odd size, because the Continental WinterContact TS 860 are hard to find (if not impossible) in that size. It's available in 225/50 R17 though. Should be very close in final diameter according to calculators, but what about the extra width? How much "play" is there with tire widths?
Trying to get the dealer to include winter tires and do not want to get the junky crap KIA ships their cars with.

Is there some reason you're stuck on the TS 860s? you can also stretch a 205/55R17 on that wheel size.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




i for one would not get that hyped up about a specific brand of nonperformance tire but good for you

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




just got close out Blizzak WS80s on wheels for the new golf. however: tire rack sent me 8.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




sharkytm posted:

Sweet. They're yours to keep if you want them, legally.

i prefer getting my money back though since it also has a separate set of wheels

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




yeah they invoiced me twice

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




the hakkas are fantastic in acutal snow but i found they wore quickly in moderate temps and were noisy in addition to not being very good in the dry. this is a few years back, though.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




yeah I was going to say i think my longest-lived set of tires got maybe 20k miles?

WS90s are on the Alltrack and it's snowed quite a bit in SEMI. They seem good so far. Not too loud in the dry, either.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Ultimate Mango posted:

In other news, I’m taking my Michelin Pilot Sport 4s through some cold but probably not snow tomorrow (luckily the I-15N not the I-5/grapevine). I shouldn’t expect much pucker factor, right?

don't drive like an idiot and you'll be fine (fairly standard advice)

dry and cold is fine, the tires are firm but they grip OK and as long as you aren't pushing it you'll be fine. wet and cold is less good but i would not anticipate any pucker factor until you get to snow and cold - but no matter what the freeway tends to stay relatively clear and dry due to traffic.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




what the gently caress

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




ps4s will spoil you for any other street performance tire especially in a big heavy car

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




don't get studs

I have WS80s i think (poo poo, maybe they're WS90s) and they're perfectly good in the snow, not too noisy on the highway, and decent in the rain. they do not corner all that well on my golf alltrack but keep in mind my ref point for cornering is an M5 with PS4S.

edit: the X-Ice is a better tire if it snows more but i live in little bitch winter SEMI so it is damp and rainy just as much as it snows even though everyone here thinks they're all hard about winter

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




taqueso posted:

I thought some brands had full sticky compound and some have half sticky half normal all-season rubber? Seems worthwhile to check that out at least.

compromises are lovely

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




snow fuckin rules

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




do a bunch of burnouts

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




meatpimp posted:

Can I whine about tires in this thread? Just took the winter wheels off the Escalade and put the 20" chromes back on, because , and saw some dry rot between the treads. 2014 Michelins, looks like this is their last season.

275/55-20.

How's the wear other than that? Six seasons is about as long as I've managed to keep any tires.

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KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




I can't imagine getting six seasons out of pretty much anything, but I guess I generally prioritize all other metrics over treadware/life, and I only buy Michelin summer tires so if they make it to 20k miles it's a miracle.

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