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Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




It's been eight years and 1255 pages since we last rebooted this thread, and it's time to bring the megathread back down to more approachable size for the new decade.

This thread is for newbies, regulars, and everyone in between to ask quick questions, get recipe ideas, and have short discussions about cooking.

The purpose of this thread is discussing how to make good food. That's it. No matter how new or experienced you are at cooking, if you have a question about recipes (that a quick Google search won't answer), technique, etc. that can be answered with a couple of replies, post it in here. The GWS gestalt will do its best to answer your question in a polite and prompt manner.

Please remember when posting:
- No Trolling.
- No condescending answer or stupid/misleading advice.
- Try to define jargon you use. Using the jargon is fine, just make sure a new cook could understand what you're saying without consulting Wikipedia or something.

As always, caveat emptor. Or as a previous General Questions thread put it,

Croatoan posted:

Now, please keep in mind that the advice you get will be coming from people who do things like this:
GWS Youtube videos!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSIOtlQHlO0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1E2INbrnDw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HF6Lyij0XQ

Finally, the amazing Toast maintains a wiki for us and it is full of recipe ideas and other cool stuff. Feel free to contribute, browse, or whatever. Find it here.

For those wishing to reference it, the old thread can be found here.

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Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Please identify this Mexican cheese for me



Has a slight funk

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




The paprika makes me think queso añejo. Is it crumbly?

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Yeah, añejo/añejo enchilado.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Can I eat the rind then?

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

this is fine





I was trying to find a different recipe but stumbled across this: https://www.thekitchn.com/why-you-should-be-lacto-fermenting-your-oatmeal-its-not-weird-at-all-224363 Can 2 Tbsp of yogurt in 1 cup of water + 1 cup of oats possibly be good for 8 hour fermentation?

Most fermentation is considered safe if the pH is low or high enough and/or the salt level is high enough. My only guess is this is "safe" because it's not a very long time, and you're inoculating with a decent population of culture in the yogurt so they can out-compete nasties. I'll probably try it this weekend for funsies, sniff test will probably keep me safe.

The other recipe I was actually looking for was oat and honey infused vodka. Has anyone ever made this? Is it worth it? I couldn't find the exact recipe but something like this: https://www.washingtonpost.com/recipes/infused-vodka-with-oats-and-honey/8334/ but I'm willing to let it go much longer if it's helpful.

triple clutcher
Jul 3, 2012


I had Ethiopian food for the first time recently, and using injera to eat with was a revelation. What would be a good starting point for making a functional equivalent? I'm assuming flour / water / salt ( maybe baking powder? ) mixed to a pancake or crepe batter consistency, then poured into and cooked in a pan.

Most of the flatbread-ish recipes I've come across seem a bit too fiddly for what I'm looking for ( ie: eggs, sugar, kneading, etc. ), I just want a low-effort alternative to rice for curries and stews and such.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




I'd look into Indian flatbreads. I don't think it gets very much easier than chapatis, although you probably won't get around the kneading. Injera itself doesn't require any, as it happens - it's just a time investment and you need the right kind of flour, but the actual making of it looks pretty managable.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

SHUT
THE
FUCK
UP!
BIIITCH!




BrianBoitano posted:

I was trying to find a different recipe but stumbled across this: https://www.thekitchn.com/why-you-should-be-lacto-fermenting-your-oatmeal-its-not-weird-at-all-224363 Can 2 Tbsp of yogurt in 1 cup of water + 1 cup of oats possibly be good for 8 hour fermentation?

Most fermentation is considered safe if the pH is low or high enough and/or the salt level is high enough. My only guess is this is "safe" because it's not a very long time, and you're inoculating with a decent population of culture in the yogurt so they can out-compete nasties. I'll probably try it this weekend for funsies, sniff test will probably keep me safe.

The other recipe I was actually looking for was oat and honey infused vodka. Has anyone ever made this? Is it worth it? I couldn't find the exact recipe but something like this: https://www.washingtonpost.com/recipes/infused-vodka-with-oats-and-honey/8334/ but I'm willing to let it go much longer if it's helpful.

Both of those look fine

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

triple clutcher posted:

I had Ethiopian food for the first time recently, and using injera to eat with was a revelation. What would be a good starting point for making a functional equivalent? I'm assuming flour / water / salt ( maybe baking powder? ) mixed to a pancake or crepe batter consistency, then poured into and cooked in a pan.

Most of the flatbread-ish recipes I've come across seem a bit too fiddly for what I'm looking for ( ie: eggs, sugar, kneading, etc. ), I just want a low-effort alternative to rice for curries and stews and such.
If you just want a flat bread to scoop up food, the easiest is roti/chapati. Three ingredients, two if you don't use salt. Manjula has a good recipe.

Squashy Nipples
Aug 18, 2007



triple clutcher posted:

I had Ethiopian food for the first time recently, and using injera to eat with was a revelation. What would be a good starting point for making a functional equivalent? I'm assuming flour / water / salt ( maybe baking powder? ) mixed to a pancake or crepe batter consistency, then poured into and cooked in a pan.

Most of the flatbread-ish recipes I've come across seem a bit too fiddly for what I'm looking for ( ie: eggs, sugar, kneading, etc. ), I just want a low-effort alternative to rice for curries and stews and such.

My ex and I took a deep dive into this a few years ago. Basically, you either go all the way, or you make substitute.

So what's a good substitute? Chickpea flatbread, it's quick and easy.
Here is a recipe for that:

https://www.veganricha.com/2019/07/socca-recipe-chickpea-flatbread-vegan-gf.html


However, there is NO replacement for Teff, it's just so yummy and full of body (lots of protein)
Teff has more then a few varieties, but it more or else shakes out as "brown" and "blonde". Good Ethiopian restaurants use a mix of both, which is what produces that funny grey color. At one or two places, I've been offered a choice between all dark or a mixture. The all brown/dark version is almost as dark as pumpernickel! When making it at home, I've usually made it with straight brown Teff, Bobs Red Mill has an excellent one.

Bad Ethiopian restaurants cut the batter with white flour. Don't do this.

Start by grinding your Teff. Then make a fairly wet batter and ferment it. The traditional Ethiopian method is expose it to environmental yeast by running it over the back of your hand, and then leaving it in the sun for 12-16 hours or so. In cold rear end Boston, it usually took 2 days before it got properly fermented, but this is subjective.

To make the bread, thin the batter to the right consistency, this will take some practice. Get your pan super hot, and then cool the surface a tiny bit by flicking some water drops onto it, and then pour and make a crepe. You'll know its done by watching the bubbles. Frying pan sized is fine for making at home, but if you want the huge resturant ones, you can buy an oversized crepe cooker and a little wooden hoe to smooth out the batter.

Here is me making some injera (please ignore my heavy breathing):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnEG7bomUU8

There are tons of other videos on YouTube, too.


EDIT:
Beaten on the advice of Indian flatbreads.

Squashy Nipples fucked around with this message at 14:00 on Jan 3, 2020

Mercedes Colomar
Nov 1, 2008


"I have to confess... I never killed anybody."
"Not even a teensy bit of killing?"
"MAYBE I JUST WASN'T TRYING HARD ENOUGH."






Oh god that video from Croatoan. Fond memories.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

We are all drinking from the highball glass of ideology.

Steve Yun posted:

Can I eat the rind then?

Yes.

SHIT POST MALONE
Feb 4, 2005

I was born down. You know this.


Today I discovered for myself that if you don't have a fine mesh strainer, a French press works perfectly fine in a pinch.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

I'm mad that the captions don't work anymore for that vid of gourd eating the pepper. They were so delightfully incorrect.

Also mad that gourd got permad after stiffing some folks in sa mart.

Mercedes Colomar
Nov 1, 2008


"I have to confess... I never killed anybody."
"Not even a teensy bit of killing?"
"MAYBE I JUST WASN'T TRYING HARD ENOUGH."






Flash Gordon Ramsay posted:

I'm mad that the captions don't work anymore for that vid of gourd eating the pepper. They were so delightfully incorrect.

Also mad that gourd got permad after stiffing some folks in sa mart.

"This is the Problem" sticks in my mind perennially.
And Space Gourd was perma'd? Shame. Would explain why I don't see them anymore.

Squashy Nipples
Aug 18, 2007



What ever happened to EggplantWizard?

Didn't she have some sort of dramatic flameout?

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
i like nice words


I thought she was the one that goons doxxed/stalked/emailed boss because she was writing erotic ebooks for cash in grad school

v I don't think it was a threat, iirc I think they did actually email her boss trying to get her fired, and she couldn't continue with that going on

Anne Whateley fucked around with this message at 04:58 on Jan 4, 2020

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




Anne Whateley posted:

I thought she was the one that goons doxxed/stalked/emailed boss because she was writing erotic ebooks for cash in grad school

This is also what I remember. The doxxing threat was unacceptable so she split.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




As a heads up, our rules thread has been updated to make a few things more explicit.

Carry on!

Fartington Butts
Jan 21, 2007



Yo goons. Does anybody know of a good sorta-easy pozole recipe? Everything I've searched for has either required two dozen ingredients or not nearly enough (Rick Bayless' is asking for shredded chicken wtf.)

Thinkin' 'bout making this on Sunday so suggestions would kick some rear end.

stinkypete
Nov 27, 2007
wow



POZOLE YES I DO!

This is an easy folk recipe for pozole New Mexico style. Get your crock pot out and throw a cheap cut of pork in it. If you are fancy cube the pork and sear it in a pan or if not just go for it and throw that cube O pork into the crock pot. If you are fancy add some sort of stock or if your are poor like me water will work although not as good. Cook the meat until tender. If you are fancy add New Mexico Red chile powder while cooking. Add Onion and I know not traditional some celery but it tastes good.

If you are poor Add the New Mexico red chile powder towards the end and lots of lime juice. I suggest Nellies key lime juice that can be bought at Walmart. Pozole is pork chile lime and some salt. Then at the very end of fancy Pozole or poor mans pozole a big ol can of Hominy, Juice and all. Mmmm I can taste this now. It should be pretty watery but flavorful boil off any liquids you want.

Now how fancy do you want to get? For me poor mans pazole we have a bottle of tapatio valentina or whatever is on hand and the bottle of lime juice for garnish. Fancy Pazole is sliced limes some sliced onions maybe some radish if super fancy a cabbage salsa. Sliced Jalapenos and Avocado is good just don't let them soak in your soup. They should be a garnish.

This reminds me of Christmas. Only use New Mexico red chile powder not that junk from California or China. Yes i am biased.

I can provide more tips if asked. Also Garlic either minced or granulated should be used.

stinkypete
Nov 27, 2007
wow



Cabbage Salsa yes I know it is not Sonoran nor New Mexican. I don't think it is Oaxican either but more of a western coastal Mexico thing. If you know where it comes from tell me. I start with a head of cabbage slice and cleaned or if lazy a bag of pre sliced coleslaw. Add one jar of pickled jalapenos with onions and carrots. Add salt pepper garlic a little salt to taste. Then marinate with lime juice to taste. This is better if it sits for a bit.

stinkypete
Nov 27, 2007
wow



While I am on a New Mexican kick / brain dump lets make Re-fried beans. Pick and clean a one pound bag of beans then rinse twice in cool sink water I use a colander. Place your beans into your instapot with 10 cups of water. Add a little bit of oil to keep the beans from boiling / frothing over. Add your seasonings I just dump in a can of pickled Jalapenos skipping any added salt. Pressure cook on High for 40 Minutes with quick release. After your beans are cooked throw them back into your colander and rinse well to get rid of the bean slime and let sit for a minute.

Grab a big ol frying pan and throw a little bit of oil just enough to cover the bottom of the pan. Pour in your beans and let them fry. Then let them fry some more. Before they get kinda shriveled flip them over as best as you can and let them fry some more. Add Garlic and lime juice then start to mash them with a potato masher or large spoon. When half mashed taste to see how much salt is needed. For good beans a lot of salt is needed and to lighten them up you can add milk in this process.

You can make them thick like I love them or thin them out with milk or some sort of vegetable broth.

stinkypete
Nov 27, 2007
wow



Rice the Great extender and quick to please. Mexican rice is quite tasty.

Look on your bag of rice to see how much water you need and adjust your cooking to that. I have used long grain and short grain with about the same results. Since this isn't a recipe but a more general guideline here we go.

Add your desired amount of dry rice to a tall pot then add just enough oil to coat the rice. Here is my Secret Fry the dried rice until about 80% is whiter than the rest of the rice. Do not let the rice get browned in the oil at all. Slowly add your water to prevent splattering. Add some Knox or other brand Tomato / chicken Bullion (it should be called tomato chicken bullion if your vegi find some tomato bullion or just add a can of diced tomatoes now) Bring to a boil then lower to a simmer and cover until the rice is cooked and should be slightly chewy. Enjoy!

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Manuel Calavera posted:

"This is the Problem" sticks in my mind perennially.
And Space Gourd was perma'd? Shame. Would explain why I don't see them anymore.

Yep. But stiffing people on SA Mart is bad.

Fartington Butts
Jan 21, 2007



stinkypete posted:

POZOLE YES I DO!

This is an easy folk recipe for pozole New Mexico style. Get your crock pot out and throw a cheap cut of pork in it. If you are fancy cube the pork and sear it in a pan or if not just go for it and throw that cube O pork into the crock pot. If you are fancy add some sort of stock or if your are poor like me water will work although not as good. Cook the meat until tender. If you are fancy add New Mexico Red chile powder while cooking. Add Onion and I know not traditional some celery but it tastes good.

If you are poor Add the New Mexico red chile powder towards the end and lots of lime juice. I suggest Nellies key lime juice that can be bought at Walmart. Pozole is pork chile lime and some salt. Then at the very end of fancy Pozole or poor mans pozole a big ol can of Hominy, Juice and all. Mmmm I can taste this now. It should be pretty watery but flavorful boil off any liquids you want.

Now how fancy do you want to get? For me poor mans pazole we have a bottle of tapatio valentina or whatever is on hand and the bottle of lime juice for garnish. Fancy Pazole is sliced limes some sliced onions maybe some radish if super fancy a cabbage salsa. Sliced Jalapenos and Avocado is good just don't let them soak in your soup. They should be a garnish.

This reminds me of Christmas. Only use New Mexico red chile powder not that junk from California or China. Yes i am biased.

I can provide more tips if asked. Also Garlic either minced or granulated should be used.

Fuckin' hell. Spent the first 7 years of my life in Albuquerque so I'm definitely goin' with yer method. Never heard of New Mexico red chile powder, though. Might just run with some of those chipotles in the adobo sauce.

And that cabbage salsa sounds dope so I'm gon' make it.

Squashy Nipples
Aug 18, 2007



stinkypete posted:

POZOLE YES I DO!

This is an easy folk recipe for pozole New Mexico style. Get your crock pot out and throw a cheap cut of pork in it. If you are fancy cube the pork and sear it in a pan or if not just go for it and throw that cube O pork into the crock pot. If you are fancy add some sort of stock or if your are poor like me water will work although not as good. Cook the meat until tender. If you are fancy add New Mexico Red chile powder while cooking. Add Onion and I know not traditional some celery but it tastes good.

If you are poor Add the New Mexico red chile powder towards the end and lots of lime juice. I suggest Nellies key lime juice that can be bought at Walmart. Pozole is pork chile lime and some salt. Then at the very end of fancy Pozole or poor mans pozole a big ol can of Hominy, Juice and all. Mmmm I can taste this now. It should be pretty watery but flavorful boil off any liquids you want.

Now how fancy do you want to get? For me poor mans pazole we have a bottle of tapatio valentina or whatever is on hand and the bottle of lime juice for garnish. Fancy Pazole is sliced limes some sliced onions maybe some radish if super fancy a cabbage salsa. Sliced Jalapenos and Avocado is good just don't let them soak in your soup. They should be a garnish.

This reminds me of Christmas. Only use New Mexico red chile powder not that junk from California or China. Yes i am biased.

I can provide more tips if asked. Also Garlic either minced or granulated should be used.

This sounds totally delicious, but very different the homemade pozole I was served in So Cal... that had pigs feet, and pig skin. And the bowls were topped with crema and fresh shredded cabbage, not pickled.



stinkypete posted:

Cabbage Salsa yes I know it is not Sonoran nor New Mexican. I don't think it is Oaxican either but more of a western coastal Mexico thing. If you know where it comes from tell me. I start with a head of cabbage slice and cleaned or if lazy a bag of pre sliced coleslaw. Add one jar of pickled jalapenos with onions and carrots. Add salt pepper garlic a little salt to taste. Then marinate with lime juice to taste. This is better if it sits for a bit.

Sounds more like pickled cabbage, but I love all things cabbage and all things pickled, so I'm going to make this as written. Thanks!

Squashy Nipples
Aug 18, 2007



Anne Whateley posted:

I thought she was the one that goons doxxed/stalked/emailed boss because she was writing erotic ebooks for cash in grad school

v I don't think it was a threat, iirc I think they did actually email her boss trying to get her fired, and she couldn't continue with that going on

Ugh, I was hoping for a funny story, but that's just horrible.


She was a really good poster in here.

toplitzin
Jun 13, 2003


Goons ruin everything.

Fartington Butts
Jan 21, 2007





This is the mediocre pozole from work is what I'm basing stuff on. So from what I gathered I can just wing it as long as it had chilies, pork, and hominy. I'm very down for this.

bartolimu
Nov 25, 2002




Squashy Nipples posted:

This sounds totally delicious, but very different the homemade pozole I was served in So Cal... that had pigs feet, and pig skin. And the bowls were topped with crema and fresh shredded cabbage, not pickled.

New Mexico style pozole is different from Californian/Mexican pozole. It's thicker, in my (limited) experience sometimes thick enough to spoon onto a plate and not have the broth running all over. The pozole in the rest of the Southwest is more brothy, more like a soup than a stew. Around here we have the higher-broth variety, served with crema and raw radishes. I guess that makes us fancy.

All pozoles are delicious, especially when they're actually menudo.

Hauki
May 11, 2010




As a native New Mexican, canned hominy is fuckin’ gross and you should definitely use dried or frozen if you can get them. Rancho Gordo of bean fame sells dried nixtamalized corn that’s pretty decent.

For pozole rojo, I also usually make my own red chile sauce and use that to season later. It’s a pretty simple step you can do while the pork and corn are cooking, but if you want to simplify, I’d use a mix of chopped canned chipotle in adobo, dried New Mexican red chile powder (Chimayo has a great earth sweetness to it) and whatever else to taste at the end.

Anyway, for said pozole rojo, my basic recipe is a smoked ham hock, ~1.5# pork shoulder, 2# of hominy (assuming frozen), a large onion, 3-5 cloves of garlic, oregano, and whatever chile products, assuming you’re not making your own sauce.

Brown pork in neutral oil (or bacon fat/lard) over med-high heat, add diced onion and sauté until starting to soften. Add salt, a healthy pinch of dried Mexican oregano, minced garlic, a couple minced chipotles in adobo & ~2T of red chile powder, sauté another minute or two until fragrant. Add pozole corn, ham hock, water (or stock) to cover by a couple inches and bring to a low simmer. Cook uncovered, stirring occasionally until pork shoulder is tender and corn blossoms, about two hours. Add more liquid as necessary, the corn absorbs a lot. Remove ham hock, allow it to cool briefly, shred the meat from the bone, discard the skin & bones and return meat to pot. Adjust seasoning to taste, let cook another 30 minutes or so, taste again.

Serve, garnish with whatever appeals - I usually have a spread of tostadas or chips, shredded cabbage, finely diced white onion, dried oregano, avocado, lime wedges, sliced radish, cotija or queso fresco, sour cream or crema, hot sauce/salsa/etc.

edit: sliced or minced fresh chiles, cilantro, misc. pickled veg, etc. are good garnishes too. I feel posole’s made in the toppings, go nuts. If I’m doing ‘classic new Mexican,’ it’s just like diced white onion, a little Mexican oregano, a scoop of sour cream & thick corn chips or tostadas on the side. Squeeze of lime over everything.

Hauki fucked around with this message at 22:47 on Jan 4, 2020

stinkypete
Nov 27, 2007
wow



I wish I could get dried or even frozen hominy at the store. Yes it is better. You are totally spot on with the bacon fat! I always fry my red New Mexico chile pods in bacon fat when making enchilada sauce to remove the bitterness. Maybe that's a Deming thing.

Fartington Butts
Jan 21, 2007



I'm very happy to have made a fight about pozole and have New Mexicans show their face.

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



stinkypete posted:

While I am on a New Mexican kick / brain dump lets make Re-fried beans. Pick and clean a one pound bag of beans then rinse twice in cool sink water I use a colander. Place your beans into your instapot with 10 cups of water. Add a little bit of oil to keep the beans from boiling / frothing over. Add your seasonings I just dump in a can of pickled Jalapenos skipping any added salt. Pressure cook on High for 40 Minutes with quick release. After your beans are cooked throw them back into your colander and rinse well to get rid of the bean slime and let sit for a minute.

Grab a big ol frying pan and throw a little bit of oil just enough to cover the bottom of the pan. Pour in your beans and let them fry. Then let them fry some more. Before they get kinda shriveled flip them over as best as you can and let them fry some more. Add Garlic and lime juice then start to mash them with a potato masher or large spoon. When half mashed taste to see how much salt is needed. For good beans a lot of salt is needed and to lighten them up you can add milk in this process.

You can make them thick like I love them or thin them out with milk or some sort of vegetable broth.

I usually use the bean broth (bean cooking water) to adjust consistency (I like mine a little loose). But definitely salt, they taste pretty bad until it's salty enough then it's magically good.

Hauki
May 11, 2010




stinkypete posted:

I wish I could get dried or even frozen hominy at the store. Yes it is better. You are totally spot on with the bacon fat! I always fry my red New Mexico chile pods in bacon fat when making enchilada sauce to remove the bitterness. Maybe that's a Deming thing.

I dunno where you’re at, but for what it’s worth I can still find dried pozole in the “Hispanic” section at even crappy groceries in Colorado, and a fair number have the bueno frozen stuff too - Costco sells like an 8 pack of 2# bags heh. I guess I’d probably just mail order a bunch of dried if I couldn’t find it locally.

And yeah, I feel the extra smoke from chipotles/moritas, bacon fat & the ham hock adds some depth, but I use bacon fat for refritos too. Haven’t spent much time in Deming though, I grew up farther north. I’ll have to try that for enchilada sauce, hah.

As far as red chile sauce goes, I usually keep it pretty simple - toast dried chile pods in a dry, wide pot until fragrant, cover with water, bring to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, drain, reserving liquid & let cool. Destem the peppers, discard seeds if you feel so inclined, put in a food processor or blender and purée, adding the reserved liquid to get whatever consistency I need. Season to taste with salt & lime juice.

I try to get a least a couple types of chile for depth of flavor, usually a combination of chimayo red (sweet/earthy), guajillo or other New Mexico red cultivar (bright/tangy) and morita or ancho (smoky/fruity).

If I want to be fussier, I’ll add whole garlic, still in the skin with the peppers as they’re toasting, pull the skins when you destem the peppers. Maybe Mexican oregano and/or ground cumin if I want those flavors. If you have leftover liquid from cooking the chiles, use it to replace some of the water in your pot of posole.

SHIT POST MALONE
Feb 4, 2005

I was born down. You know this.


If I'm making soup that is chicken broth + canned coconut milk as the base and I've let it simmer too long, should I just put more broth in it to thin it out again?

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




More broth will make it more chickeny since you've already concentrated the chicken-ness by simmering it down too much. There's nothing inherently wrong with that but if you want to just thin it out some use water.

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stinkypete
Nov 27, 2007
wow



Hauki posted:

I dunno where you’re at, but for what it’s worth I can still find dried pozole in the “Hispanic” section at even crappy groceries in Colorado, and a fair number have the bueno frozen stuff too - Costco sells like an 8 pack of 2# bags heh. I guess I’d probably just mail order a bunch of dried if I couldn’t find it locally.

And yeah, I feel the extra smoke from chipotles/moritas, bacon fat & the ham hock adds some depth, but I use bacon fat for refritos too. Haven’t spent much time in Deming though, I grew up farther north. I’ll have to try that for enchilada sauce, hah.

As far as red chile sauce goes, I usually keep it pretty simple - toast dried chile pods in a dry, wide pot until fragrant, cover with water, bring to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, drain, reserving liquid & let cool. Destem the peppers, discard seeds if you feel so inclined, put in a food processor or blender and purée, adding the reserved liquid to get whatever consistency I need. Season to taste with salt & lime juice.

I try to get a least a couple types of chile for depth of flavor, usually a combination of chimayo red (sweet/earthy), guajillo or other New Mexico red cultivar (bright/tangy) and morita or ancho (smoky/fruity).

If I want to be fussier, I’ll add whole garlic, still in the skin with the peppers as they’re toasting, pull the skins when you destem the peppers. Maybe Mexican oregano and/or ground cumin if I want those flavors. If you have leftover liquid from cooking the chiles, use it to replace some of the water in your pot of posole.

I knew it I knew it! Made my night. It is funny how you can tell where someone is from by their recipe's. I have some Sonaran bleeding in from Arizona.

My bean recipes are all for Pinto's. Up North they use these magical Anasazi beans. The chile's down south are hot to very very hot.

I miss good tortilla's and tortilla chips. The only commercial salsa I will eat is Sadies Salsa.

I want to go back to visit now.

Zia

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