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mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Thank you for the OP and also goddamn that style of art is so iconic. Not just for war stuff, but old space logos, car ads, or even just “we are farming over here” posters.

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mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85MDZfZr1ag

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Here are some missiles doing missile things.

AIM-9X
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YMSfg26YSQ

THAAD shooting an MRBM dropped out of a C-17:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYr6hYVpxxw

Saudi F-15 intercepts of Houthi drones:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNpr24uLr-g#t=32s

The missile rides low, because it knows it doesn't ride high
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LjN3UclYzU

B-1Bs are kind of missiles?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kfp-G4NWyJs

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Vincent Van Goatse posted:

I heard there's a lot going on in air defense artillery.

Yeah it’s p busy nowadays.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

People seem pretty decent at comprehending a big, very rare nuclear disaster but less so at understanding cumulative deaths and climate impact from extracting and burning fossil fuels.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Some Training/Period videos:

Ejection Decision - A second Too Late! (1981)
"Amazingly, though the impact broke his spine, that's not what killed him. He burned to death in the fireball."

"Passed through our spin-chute altitude at 22,000 feet. I deployed the spin-chute as briefed, and the spin-chute came off in the maneuver. Now things were not going as expected."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aa1Ba_NEobs

FLAK!
Good breakdown of German AAA systems and survivability maneuvers.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIYVwqHM488

This is pre-WWII, but I link it because it is a masterclass of how to make a training video get somewhat complex mechanics across to a layperson. Hotlinked beyond the hook, because if you're clicking this link, you probably don't need fancy motorcycle displays to get your attention:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYAw79386WI#t=110s

Aggressor F-16s knocking out F-14s in training:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MKnR3BzSRY

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Was?

gently caress, we still shoot GBI like a schoolmarm without her glasses on dumping her revolver toward the door.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Some good Kawasaki C-1 footage.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQdfhMcpigo

Labeled as "ASMR," because the internet makes you stupid.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

If you’re ever in the southwest with some time to travel, the mix of Pima, minuteman (Tucson), nuclear museum (ABQ), and WSMR is just really solid and all within a reasonable-for-the-American-west distance of one another if you are either on a road trip or have a central launch point like working out of El Paso or Tucson or WSMR.

And delicious food. The travel distances are a bit daunting at first, but road tripping in the American Southwest is long in distance but light in frustration or traffic.

Managed to knock out the ordnance museum this year via a fortunately located/times work trip and a very tolerant spouse who embraces that I plan trips around proximity to swimmable ocean, mountains, and museums.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

The US‘s Iranian system naming conventions can get hosed.

“Let’s just put IR in front of names to designate an Iranian system.”

So, for example, an IR-SA-3 is an Iranian SA-3?

“No, stupid, it’s an Iranian SAM system and may well have zilch to do with an SA-3.”

Hey are we going to come up with shorthands for their ballistic missiles or just all learn to write Anglicized versions of Farsi names?

“Zolfaghar is a beautiful word.”

And it means?

“Spine-cleaver, roughly”

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

https://t.co/gNSVcbqv9c?amp=1

NYT has a good breakdown of the myth of the term “Steel Rain” coming from Iraqis and MLRS DPICM performance in combat in Iraq compared to its advertised use against Russian armored formations.

tl;dr more duds than planned/expected from both fuse failures and also the environment (soft sand), and in a friendly fire incident, the DPICM rounds failed to disable Bradleys or even some Chevy SUVs that US troops were using.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

There are still recruitment problems for specific jobs, if not in total number of bodies.

For air defense, a bunch of the MOS's require high GT scores, little or zero criminal record, and little or no bad finanicial reporting. People with those qualifications either don't joint the Army, or they don't want to go to the not-very-glamorous world of air defense and then enjoy a really, really rough Deploy to Dwell ratio, with those deployments being almost entirely to pretty unglamorous or, more recently, straight up middle-of-nowhere locales in the middle east. With no real sign of slowing down. Since last May, the public number of air defense troops deployed to the middle east has more than doubled.

I also don't think the family business is a great long-term solution:

quote:

More and more, new recruits are the children of old recruits. In 2019, 79 percent of Army recruits reported having a family member who served. For nearly 30 percent, it was a parent — a striking point in a nation where less than 1 percent of the population serves in the military.

For years, military leaders have been sounding the alarm over the growing gulf between communities that serve and those that do not, warning that relying on a small number of counties that reliably produce soldiers is unsustainable, particularly now amid escalating tensions with Iran.

“A widening military-civilian divide increasingly impacts our ability to effectively recruit and sustain the force,” Anthony M. Kurta, acting under secretary of defense for personnel and readiness, told the National Commission on Military, National and Public Service last year. “This disconnect is characterized by misperceptions, a lack of knowledge and an inability to identify with those who serve. It threatens our ability to recruit the number of quality youth with the needed skill sets to maintain our advantage.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/10/us/military-enlistment.html


Are there enough of these? You never know.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Force Management makes a kind of beep boop sense, but I have known exactly one person in my entire life who opted to go FM as a CPT(P). He basically was sick and loving tired of deployments and decided he could pound his face into FM while his wife got some stability and finished her degrees.

So it might be the type of place where searching for number crunchy and legal/policy wonks makes sense.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

The Wu-Tang Killer Bees.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Japan did not ratify the geneva conventions until the 1950s.

Maybe Friedman is still stuck in the 1940s?

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

To avoid false impressions “near” is often used in military parlance.

For a different example, Link-16 is near-real time data. This is both because there is inherently some level of lag on a system transmitting via RF, Satellite, internet, serial line, or whatever and also because Link-16 works by giving each net participant a very tiny interval in which to use the net, so users are uploading in (very fast) sequence rather than simultaneously. To the user the lag may be all of a second or several, but that still is not true “realtime.”

For this test could be anything from F-35 or IBCS system limitation, presentation of targets on the test range, or could be reference to Patriot launchers not launching missiles truly simultaneously, just in very quick succession.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

zoux posted:

It's the air breathing part I don’t understand, like jet engine intake?

Oh. Has an engine that uses air to function. Jet, turbojet, piston, etc. Not ballistic ordnance or rocket engine.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

The F-35 has achieved a capability not seen since like 8 years ago with JLENS regarding sending remote fire control quality data to Patriot.

Don’t @ me, I’m being deliberately simplistic.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Warbadger posted:

Eh, it's actually pretty novel in broadening the scope of platforms capable of doing it. JLENS, for example, isn't necessarily going to be able to operate in the same conditions as an F-35.

For example, a “fiscally constrained environment,”

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

My favorite graphic from an air defense manual shows a Cobra helicopter unmasking from behind trees to engage a Tiger I tank.

Also this image. The manual is from 2016.



edit: ATP 3-01.18 "Techniques for Combined Arms for Air Defense " (how non-air defense can defend itself form air threats) has a bunch of funny graphics because it's obvious the doctrine writers were told to rapidly publish/update it because of drone or other aerial threats, so it's got a bunch of repurposed old images and copy-paste advice where someone just did a find and replace of M60 to M240, etc. It has unlimited distribution and is approved for public release, so you can find it online easily.

mlmp08 fucked around with this message at 17:20 on Jan 27, 2020

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

hobbesmaster posted:

Ok, I'm going to post a political horse race tweet but PLEASE IGNORE THAT PART.

https://twitter.com/TheAtlantic/status/1221827357276807169

When was the last time "a ruthless modern army armed with cluster bombs and napalm" beat partisans?

I'm really having trouble coming up with an example in the 20th century. Spanish civil war?

Examples of insurgents/partisans getting crushed pretty hard in recent history through a variety of modern army, weaponry, or other state technical/numerical superiority:

ISIS (not gone, but severely rolled back)
Muslim Brotherhood in Syria getting smashed by Hafez al-Assad (father of Bashar al-Assad president) in 1982 using artillery and air-power followed by a ground clearing operation (and massacre).
Hukbalahap Rebellion
Dhofar Rebellion
Xinjiang conflict
Mau Mau Uprising

We remember the successful insurgencies because they are notable and costly.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

To add: modern armies with air power probably deter a lot more insurgencies than they ever need to defeat.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

People sometimes just loudly “cacaw” to denote blue falconry.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Strong cold war (and dolphin) vibes.


https://twitter.com/nukestrat/status/1222510655586152449?s=21

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost


My God what a cursed boat,
She steams at full ahead
the mess is flooding now
My God what a cursed boat!

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

There is a whole lot going on.


https://twitter.com/oriana0214/status/1222911900729729026?s=21

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

It’s an old euphemism, not really a rebranding. They needed something to tell kids at airshows in the 70s when they asked about the BUFF name.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

To add, for a while, both the US and the Soviet Union went hard on the idea of mid-range nukes and tactical nukes and collectively Europe realized that the Soviets and Americans could conceivably write off Europe as a nuclear combat hellzone if it meant avoiding strategic nukes being dropped on the two great powers’ homelands.

MAD was preferable for nations potentially caught in the middle.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Defense reporters getting pissed that a more mainstream site got traffic with a clickbaity old news headline are amusing, even though I’m sure I’d be frustrated if I were them.


https://twitter.com/aviation_intel/status/1222940756538613760?s=21

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

https://twitter.com/oriana0214/status/1224787799980892160?s=21

Interesting proof of concept.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Blistex posted:

At the risk of sounding racist, the first bolded part should have prevented the second bolded part, or at the least required draconian security measures.

Not how it works. Vetting clearances based on ongoing relationships, status, and social/professional connections is one thing. Discrimination against US citizens based on national origin is another.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

It’s a lovely, impractical, and un-American practice to barr people from clearances based on national origin of US citizens.

For example, a lot of people fled Iran in 1979 who are not fans of the current leadership.

Or people growing up in the USSR or Warsaw-pact nations fleeing west.

And if someone’s parents deliberately broke ties from a country and brought them to the states at age 2, there may not be strong ties.

Someone works for 25 years in an adversary nation, then moves to the US and fast-tracks to citizenship via joining the military or defense industry? Sure, check on that person’s connections.

E: it also depends. I knew a guy who had issues with his clearance renewal because of his Iranian-American wife. Because his focus area was Iran. Meanwhile, she ALSO had a clearance but with a different federal agency and focus.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

I’ve known more than a few TS/SCI folks from middle eastern and former soviet countries.

I don’t know the demographics (or if they make those remotely public), but it’s neither mega-common not uncommon?

Also plenty of naturalized Mexican-Americans with TS clearances just by nature of a fair number of naturalized Mexican-Americans seeking military or other government jobs.

One of my childhood friends became an intel officer for the Air Force, and he was a naturalized Vietnamese citizen.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

A.o.D. posted:

Unless he was North Vietnamese that's not an apples to apples comparison.

It is also not apples to apples to compare every naturalized Chinese-American citizen to every known foreign spy who was a Chinese-American citizen. That includes people who came to America from China as a result of luck of immigration while leaving communist China or fleeing/seeking out-of-China residency in the aftermath of Tienanmen square.

quote:

Prior to the Chinese Student Protection Act of 1992 (CSPA), President George H.W Bush issued Executive Order 12711 in 1990. This policy implementation was solidified by the actual Act in 1992. The Act's main sponsors were Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) for the House of Representatives and Senator Slade Gorton (R-WA) for the Senate. The Chinese Student Protection Act of 1992 was passed on May 21, 1992 by the Senate, and passed by the House of Representatives on August 10, 1992. President George H. W. Bush signed it into law on October 9, 1992. The Chinese Student Protection Act became Public Law 102-404, 106 Stat. 1969.

The Chinese Student Protection Act established permanent residence for Chinese nationals that came to the United States from June 5, 1989 to April 11, 1990. The Act was targeted towards students. The CSPA was prompted by the political repression the Chinese faced after the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Chinese students who were in the United States during the time of the protests participated in TV interviews, demonstration rallies, and were featured in newspaper articles. Chinese nationals were eligible to apply for permanent residency, even with expired passports. Over the years, the Act granted green cards to an estimated number of 54,000 Chinese nationals.[1]

Also when he came over, there was no North or South Vietnam. There was just Vietnam, because Saigon had been overrun and the South had already surrendered.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Banged in the Butt by the Notion that OPM Wouldn't Lose my SF-86.

fake edit:

closest I could find

not really that terribly NWS, but still unparsed: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51kWBAZDWLL.jpg

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

zoux posted:

Uh, how was that guy not in jail

You can admit to crimes on clearance forms/interviews without facing charges. There's not enough context there to really know, but it's possible he was afraid someone would out him in an interview and volunteered the info to avoid evidence of being untruthful or hiding a blackmail liability? It's also possible they have the info some other way.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

wiegieman posted:

Wouldn't a large number of drones with modern IR cameras completely change the nature of the Vietnam bombing war? Imagine having Gorgon Stare during all that.

I suspect with that sort of support you'd potentially get to go from losing the Vietnam War to simply killing a shitload more enemy combatants, having less US/ARVN casualties, but not winning either. Maybe the US/ARVN forces operated from more or less secure outposts and crushed major attacks before they could materialize and doing significantly more effective jobs cutting up enemy supply lines, but still ultimately not just "beating" North Vietnam and the VC. For a long time. Until Americans grew weary of it or the South Vietnamese asked us to leave, maybe.

I dunno, counterfactuals hard, so what.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Please ignore the US pol portion of the thread, posting for the Scandinavia Defense take.


https://twitter.com/thinkdefence/status/1225755197823123456?s=21

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

The Strategic Hamlet program kinda sounds like a good idea if pitched well, but in execution, ohhh nooooooo

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mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Space Gopher posted:

What are the parts you're thinking could have gone well with good execution?

Even with the best intentions and competent planners top to bottom, "forced resettlement of rural populations" is never going to go well.

When I say pitched well, I mean I can imagine military and vietnamese leadership buying this if it were pitched at a presentation. But then when they try it, they do it the worst ways possible. Not that with tweaks it would’ve been a big success.

As for the forced resettlement, that wasn’t inherently part of the original plan. Fortifying existing hamlets or small moves (you keep your ancestral villages and fields, but we’re moving houses a hundred meters here and there) was an option but they went whole hog on moving as many people as possible as quickly as possible and then didn’t have the forces or will to defend these forcibly relocated people.

One of the South Vietnamese guys working implementation found out it was pissing off locals and causing them to tolerate VC incursion, so he ramped it up as hard as possible because he was secretly a VC sympathizer.

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