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Jamie Faith
Jan 13, 2020

little miss cancel crusader


Edit: Never mind. Problem has been fixed

Jamie Faith fucked around with this message at 23:16 on Oct 20, 2020

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Christoph
Mar 3, 2005


I bought a house and I plan on converting the basement workshop into an office. To do so, these cool old cabinets need to be removed. I put them on Craigslist under FREE and got ten million responses, but it occurred to me that I have no idea how to remove them (or if I can) without destroying them and everything they're attached to. I don't really trust strangers to remove them carefully.







Interior:





Thoughts? Suggestions?

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

They look like built ins. You don't remove them without destroying/dismantling them.

Christoph
Mar 3, 2005


Motronic posted:

They look like built ins. You don't remove them without destroying/dismantling them.

Aw nuts. Do people do that, though? Is it common?

Goober Peas
Jun 30, 2007

Check out my 'Vette, bro




And destroying the walls they're attached to. It's a shame, they're nice looking and probably well constructed. Which is why you got a bazillion replies.

Yes - it's common especially in a 50s vintage house to have built-ins. Which I'm presuming yours is a 50s house since that knotty pine was all the rage then.

Goober Peas fucked around with this message at 22:03 on Oct 20, 2020

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Christoph posted:

Aw nuts. Do people do that, though? Is it common?

Not anymore, but certainly at the time the look of those indicate.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




wesleywillis posted:

Boob light base?

Ceiling fan medallion. To commemorate the time you said fuckit I'm not going to deal with this poo poo.

mutata
Mar 1, 2003

You walk in with the Turnips, you leave with the Bells.



tater_salad posted:

Ceiling fan medallion. To commemorate the time you said fuckit I'm not going to deal with this poo poo.

Yeah, that's fair enough. That is the TRUE previous owner fixit.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




I have a bigass ugly one in my bedroom because they sucked at running the wire and just went whelp..

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



Motronic posted:

You're going absolutely nuts bombing every subforum with your new house problems. You need to do a better job triaging what matters and what doesn't. For your own sanity.
This is good advice. I've learned to make my peace with minor poo poo I can't be bothered with.

Definitely guilty of cross posting to get advice from a wider pool of people too.

Home ownership! Woo!

The Gardenator
May 4, 2007




I demolished my built in kitchen cabinets, they were affixed partially to the wall with nails from the inside of my wood wall planks. They weren't nearly as nice as your though.

Blakkout
Aug 24, 2006

No thought was put into this.

Toebone posted:

I cut a hole (roughly 1'x1') in a plaster & lathe wall and need to patch it back up. It's in the back corner of a closet so "good enough" is fine - cut a piece of drywall to size, tape & mud?

Yes, more than fine. Alternatively, I've used a bit of spray foam as backing with just mud and paint over that for small holes. Faster and crappier than your solution, but it worked well for the back of my closet where no one will ever look.

EDIT: RE: ceiling medalion/boob light base talk: I've found that priming and painting the flimsy plastic ones makes them look a little less like flimsy plastic and a little more like real wood.

Blakkout fucked around with this message at 18:25 on Oct 22, 2020

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Blakkout posted:

EDIT: RE: ceiling medalion/boob light base talk: I've found that priming and painting the flimsy plastic ones makes them look a little less like flimsy plastic and a little more like real wood.

They're supposed to look like plaster. And yeah, painting them definitely takes the smooth plastic look away.

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


We're taking down the drywall and adding insulation and a window to a room my brother in law is staying squatting in. He's doing most of the work since this is the kind of poo poo he usually does. The window we're putting in is a leftover from a previous renovation my neighbor did, but it matches our house perfectly. Since we're going through the effort and expense of adding the insulation, is there a way to tell if the window my neighbor gave me is better or worse than buying something at a big box store? I'd rather buy something useful rather than install something that's going to be drafty and lovely.

Edit to add that the windows aren't anything fancy, and they're probably at least 15-20 years old.

HycoCam
Jul 14, 2016

You should have backed Transverse!


two_beer_bishes posted:

We're taking down the drywall and adding insulation and a window to a room my brother in law is staying squatting in. He's doing most of the work since this is the kind of poo poo he usually does. The window we're putting in is a leftover from a previous renovation my neighbor did, but it matches our house perfectly. Since we're going through the effort and expense of adding the insulation, is there a way to tell if the window my neighbor gave me is better or worse than buying something at a big box store? I'd rather buy something useful rather than install something that's going to be drafty and lovely.

Edit to add that the windows aren't anything fancy, and they're probably at least 15-20 years old.
You want to install double-pane windows that don't have a blown seal. (Two pieces of glass with inert gas between them.) The lower the quality of the window, the older it is, the more it gets twisted up--the more likely the seal is to going to fail. You can tell a failed sealed by discoloration and or condensation between the panes. You can also replace top and bottom sashes on windows as a way of fixing a blown seal.

Double pane are standard now because of the benefits to both insulating the house and as a sound barrier.

If your neighbor gave you single pane windows--the big box stores windows will be better. If the windows have blown seals--the replacement cost for a sash is going to be about the same as a big box window. You mentioned insulating so I'm thinking you are opening enough of the wall to cut the old window out of the rough-in framing and put in a replacement--measure. Don't guess at your rough in opening--measure it. You can fix slightly smaller windows in a larger rough-in opening, but going to have a hard time going the other way.

BRAKE FOR MOOSE
Jun 6, 2001

It Could Save Your Life
HUNDREDS OF COLLISIONS




Those look sick, you sure you can't just carve out a couple spots (e.g. desk nook) to turn that into office space?

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Also there now exist low-e windows which don't tint the color of the light much at all. Or at least the stickers on the windows I installed claimed to be low-e.

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

What I've read makes it sound like unless that window was nearly top-of-the-line when it was new, most anything new you get today is going to be at least somewhat better

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


Thanks guys, that's pretty much what I figured. It's a single pane window so I'll have to price out a new window because I don't want to do all this work with the insulation just to have a piece of poo poo window that's going to be drafty.

regulargonzalez
Aug 18, 2006
UNGH LET ME LICK THOSE BOOTS DADDY HULU YES YES GIVE ME ALL THE CORPORATE CUMMIES ADBLOCK USERS DESERVE THE DEATH PENALTY, DON'T THEY DADDY?
WHEN THE RICH GET RICHER I GET HORNIER


The cheapo option will be to use that single pane window and put a layer of insulating shrink-film on the frame.

You can't open the window then of course, but you probably don't want to open it much in the winter anyway. Come spring you can remove the film, use it like a regular window, then do the film again in the summer and/or winter

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



What's the best way to remove IKEA warning stickers from the unfinished wooden panel? I looked up if it's safe to use Goo Gone, but it says it's not safe for unfinished wood. Can I just get sand paper and whittle it down? I just don't want a gigantic ugly sticker every time I open the drawers. Even my tried and true hair dryer trick seems to be sluggish at best.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Bioshuffle posted:

What's the best way to remove IKEA warning stickers from the unfinished wooden panel? I looked up if it's safe to use Goo Gone, but it says it's not safe for unfinished wood. Can I just get sand paper and whittle it down? I just don't want a gigantic ugly sticker every time I open the drawers. Even my tried and true hair dryer trick seems to be sluggish at best.

Naphtha, acetone, or lacquer thinner should do it and should leave any residue on the wood, especially if you lightly sand it afterwards.

E: acetone and lacquer thinner will definitely gently caress up any finish it gets on, so I would try naphtha first. It’s in the paint department at Lowe’s or wherever as ‘VM & P naphtha’

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


regulargonzalez posted:

The cheapo option will be to use that single pane window and put a layer of insulating shrink-film on the frame.

You can't open the window then of course, but you probably don't want to open it much in the winter anyway. Come spring you can remove the film, use it like a regular window, then do the film again in the summer and/or winter

I don't even want a window to begin with. My jackass brother in law doesn't need a 3rd window "for air flow" when his room just smells like farts so at this point unless he does the work and pays for the new window, it's not getting installed. I really appreciate everyone's input on this; it's given me the info I need to make a proper decision on this project.

HycoCam
Jul 14, 2016

You should have backed Transverse!


two_beer_bishes posted:

I don't even want a window to begin with. My jackass brother in law doesn't need a 3rd window "for air flow" when his room just smells like farts so at this point unless he does the work and pays for the new window, it's not getting installed. I really appreciate everyone's input on this; it's given me the info I need to make a proper decision on this project.
I glossed over the OP part about the window not currently existing. If all you're using to reach the 3rd floor window is a ladder--cutting a hole in the side of your house, fixing the siding, and flashing everything is its own set of challenges that far off thee ground. $200-$300 for a new window isn't the deal breaker. I'd be noping out at the brother in law cutting any holes in the side of my not leaking house.

ArtVandelay
Jul 13, 2004



So, I asked a question about my water heater at the very end of the last thread. I had a plumber come today, and he told me that it likely was full of sediment, but that since it was around 6 years old, cleaning it wouldn't make any difference. He wanted to sell me a 40 gallon tank for $1200. Was he full of poo poo and trying to rip me off here? Is he at least right that cleaning it won't solve anything at this point?

ArtVandelay fucked around with this message at 18:38 on Oct 24, 2020

Christoph
Mar 3, 2005


BRAKE FOR MOOSE posted:

Those look sick, you sure you can't just carve out a couple spots (e.g. desk nook) to turn that into office space?

Yeah, maybe I'll just do that. Or I'll just paint Warhammer figurines there, who needs an office, really?

Does anyone know a good guide for building the studs for a wet wall? I'm coming along in my conversion of a closet to a bathroom, but I'm not sure how to put the studs in for the shower wall itself.

Edit: Visual guide or video would be most appreciated because words hard

Christoph fucked around with this message at 19:10 on Oct 24, 2020

Goober Peas
Jun 30, 2007

Check out my 'Vette, bro




I can't speak to price as it's variable upon location. Most hot water tanks are rated to last 10-15 years, but again location makes a difference. With hard water expect 8-12 years. If you're having issues at 6 years you probably have really hard water, and should be flushing your tank at least once a quarter if not more. And probably should consider a water softening system.

In theory you could drain the tank and run vinegar or CLR through and let it soak. It's messy and time consuming, and results aren't guaranteed. And you want to flush well afterwards. All of the above is true only if the issue is mineral build-up. I can see where for most plumbers replacement would be the best resolution - fewer callbacks and unhappy customers.

Since you're likely going to need a new tank, I'd get a second or third estimate, if you can hold out.

Goober Peas fucked around with this message at 15:23 on Oct 25, 2020

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


HycoCam posted:

I'd be noping out at the brother in law cutting any holes in the side of my not leaking house.

This is a really good point that I hadn't considered.

Bi-la kaifa
Feb 4, 2011

Space maggots.



Motronic posted:

Yes.









Do you want real answers? Start posting pictures that are meaningful maybe with scale and some idea of what you are trying to do.

We finally moved in so I can get you some tangible details. The posts in question are 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 inches and are 3 1/2 feet tall. They're fastened to the deck with bolts. I'm not certain on the deck's construction other than it was redone in the last ten years and it was done professionally. The posts are 5 1/2 feet apart where a gate would go, so I'm not sure if I should do one bigger gate or smaller double gates.





I just want to know that these aren't going to bust under the weight of a wooden gate mounted on them, assuming they were installed correctly and are in good condition.

Rad Valtar
May 31, 2011

CONGRESS SHALL MAKE NO LAW RESPECTING AN ESTABLISHMENT OF RELIGION, OR PROHIBITING THE FREE EXERCISE THEREOF; OR ABRIDGING THE FREEDOM OF SPEECH, OR OF THE PRESS; OR THE RIGHT OF THE PEOPLE PEACEABLY TO ASSEMBLE, AND TO PETITION THE GOVERNMENT FOR A REDRESS OF GRIEVANCES.


I have a question and I’m not really sure if there is a good thread to ask it in. The plumber is coming tomorrow and has to cut into my bedroom wall to repair pipes for my shower. I have to get someone to replace the drywall after but he can’t come for a few days after the work. I’m wondering what the best solution is for covering up the giant hole that will be in the wall until the drywall guy can come and fix it? I was thinking of either covering it with plastic or cardboard. Any other better solutions?

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

sparkle and shine



Rad Valtar posted:

I have a question and I’m not really sure if there is a good thread to ask it in. The plumber is coming tomorrow and has to cut into my bedroom wall to repair pipes for my shower. I have to get someone to replace the drywall after but he can’t come for a few days after the work. I’m wondering what the best solution is for covering up the giant hole that will be in the wall until the drywall guy can come and fix it? I was thinking of either covering it with plastic or cardboard. Any other better solutions?

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3944478&userid=0&perpage=40&pagenumber=1#post509075005

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



https://www.homedepot.com/p/Master-Flow-4-in-Round-Heavy-Duty-Wall-Vent-with-Damper-in-White-HDWV4W/301762209

Is this an adequate replacement for all the vent covers? I am a bit put off by the lack of screws to secure the vent to the wall. Am I just supposed to use caulk to adhere it?

I can't seem to find anything better at Home Depot, and I need to replace all my vent covers outside.

I see 4 inch and 6 inch vent sizes. Is there a standardized size? Or do I need to rip out one vent and take some measurements?

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Naphtha, acetone, or lacquer thinner should do it and should leave any residue on the wood, especially if you lightly sand it afterwards.

E: acetone and lacquer thinner will definitely gently caress up any finish it gets on, so I would try naphtha first. It’s in the paint department at Lowe’s or wherever as ‘VM & P naphtha’
I was getting desperate and the dresser needed to be finished, so I just ended up scrubbing it down with good old fashioned soap. It worked out beautifully.

Bioshuffle fucked around with this message at 02:56 on Oct 26, 2020

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Rad Valtar posted:

I have a question and I’m not really sure if there is a good thread to ask it in. The plumber is coming tomorrow and has to cut into my bedroom wall to repair pipes for my shower. I have to get someone to replace the drywall after but he can’t come for a few days after the work. I’m wondering what the best solution is for covering up the giant hole that will be in the wall until the drywall guy can come and fix it? I was thinking of either covering it with plastic or cardboard. Any other better solutions?

Ask them to cut it as a big square or whatever. Buy a box of 10'x100' 3mil plastic and cut a strip, then masking tape it to the wall. Use scissors not a knife.

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





H110Hawk posted:

Ask them to cut it as a big square or whatever. Buy a box of 10'x100' 3mil plastic and cut a strip, then masking tape it to the wall. Use scissors not a knife.

Unless you already have it those rolls are expensive. Get masking or painters tape and tape a trash bag over the hole instead.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


tangy yet delightful posted:

Unless you already have it those rolls are expensive. Get masking or painters tape and tape a trash bag over the hole instead.

Or this. I have found having a box of that stuff on hand has been really useful.

Blakkout
Aug 24, 2006

No thought was put into this.

ArtVandelay posted:

So, I asked a question about my water heater at the very end of the last thread. I had a plumber come today, and he told me that it likely was full of sediment, but that since it was around 6 years old, cleaning it wouldn't make any difference. He wanted to sell me a 40 gallon tank for $1200. Was he full of poo poo and trying to rip me off here? Is he at least right that cleaning it won't solve anything at this point?

I would at least try to drain it and see what comes out. All that would cost you is 40 gallons of water to refill, whatever gas/electric it takes to heat it back up again, and a few minutes of actual work. If that doesn't help clear things up, you can always still replace it and you haven't lost much.

This worked well for my 8-year-old water heater when I moved into my house, which, as far as I can tell was never drained or otherwise maintained at all. I also had some guy quote me $1K (in Minneapolis) for a replacement when my water smelled bad and was slightly discolored. I watched a few YouTube videos on maintenance, ended up draining the whole 50 gallons and replacing the anode rod ($20 at Home Depot). All sorts of nasty sediment came out of the bottom when I drained it. When I was done, the water that came out of my tap was noticeably cleaner. Even if I have to repeat the process or replace the tank in another year I consider that a win, but your time may be more valuable than mine.

Pham Nuwen
Oct 30, 2010




One of the windows on the house has a little hole in the outer pane. Looks like somebody shot it with a bb gun... but there's another hole precisely like it in a window on the shed behind the house, so I'm wondering if it's just some defective glass.

Anyway, what should I expect to pay to get the pane replaced? It's not a huge window, perhaps 2'x2'. Horizontal sliding. The hole is, of course, on the fixed part of the window, not the sliding side.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Pham Nuwen posted:

I'm wondering if it's just some defective glass.

lololol. No. It is not defective glass. It's been shot at.

The glass itself is a few dollars. How much it costs depends on what type of window it is (horizontal sliding is not nearly specific enough - is it single pane, double? Aluminum? Wood?), how hard it is to get at (looks like bars on the outside of your shot up window), and what labor rates are in your area are.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

Idle curiosity: would it be feasible to use something like a windshield repair kit to fix this? You'd need to have some airtight and fairly rigid backing for the other side of the glass, is the main tricky bit. Obviously only feasible for single-pane glass too.

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Pham Nuwen
Oct 30, 2010




Motronic posted:

lololol. No. It is not defective glass. It's been shot at.

The glass itself is a few dollars. How much it costs depends on what type of window it is (horizontal sliding is not nearly specific enough - is it single pane, double? Aluminum? Wood?), how hard it is to get at (looks like bars on the outside of your shot up window), and what labor rates are in your area are.

I guess I thought "the outer pane" was a clear enough indicator, but it is a double-paned window. Aluminum frame. And yes, of course it manages to be one of the two windows that have bars over them, which are perhaps 4 inches from the glass and held on by 4 bolts. Area is Albuquerque, where drat near everybody puts bars over the windows here, even in the nice parts of town, so at least the glass guys should be used to it.

My deep apologies for assuming that the identical damage which also appears on the shed in the fenced-in backyard might have arisen from cheap or poorly-installed glass instead of rampant jackasses with BB guns, although frankly that wouldn't be especially surprising considering we're near a high school.

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