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Forum Joe
Jun 7, 2001

Every day I'm shuffling!

Ask me about Tasmania!

Problem description:Hello,
I need some advice. My desktop computer has started randomly freezing/blackscreening. All graphical output, USB devices and sound stop, but the fans and internal LEDs stay on. Powering off the computer and then powering on again fixes it, and it's good to go for another few hours. This happens when playing 3D games, not when web-browsing or working on documents, etc.
So, it seems likely to be a faulty GPU, a faulty PSU or just an underspec PSU. How do I determine which it is?
I'd rather not spend money replacing the PSU to find out it's the GPU and vice versa.

However, it leads to a bigger question about calculating PSU capacity, which is not something I've ever been good out. How do I know what capacity PSU I need? It's not something I've ever worried about in the past.
Realistically, if I'm going to buy a new PSU, I'd rather buy one with a higher output so I can upgrade the graphics card as well. How do I know what to get, especially if I'm going to be getting a Geforce 3070 in the future.
Attempted fixes: It's been happening for a year or two, but hasn't got better or worse. Haven't really tried anything, just put up with it. Googling just says "probably faulty PSU" trying to establish the fact.

Recent changes: Added a new drive, didn't seem to make the problem better or worse, which makes me think it's maybe not the PSU

--

Operating system: Windows 10 x64

System specs: Here are my specs, let me know if there's more stuff I should include to help me with my problem.

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 1600
Mobo: MSI B350M (MS-7A39)
RAM: 16Gb DDR4
GPU: GeForce GTX 1060 6Gb
Storage: 2 SSDs, 2 Platter HDDs
PSU: KCAS-600W: https://aerocool.io/product/kcas-600w/

Location: Australia

I have Googled and read the FAQ: Yes

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oldskool
Aug 9, 2010





Lipstick Apathy

I had a similar problem many years ago, and it was the graphics card overheating. Is there anything in the event viewer that gives more information around the time of the crashes?

Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



Forum Joe posted:

So, it seems likely to be a faulty GPU, a faulty PSU or just an underspec PSU. How do I determine which it is? I'd rather not spend money replacing the PSU to find out it's the GPU and vice versa.

If there's nothing in event viewer then using onboard video and/or testing the GPU in another machine will narrow things down.

How old are the GPU and PSU?

Forum Joe posted:

However, it leads to a bigger question about calculating PSU capacity, which is not something I've ever been good out. How do I know what capacity PSU I need? It's not something I've ever worried about in the past. Realistically, if I'm going to buy a new PSU, I'd rather buy one with a higher output so I can upgrade the graphics card as well. How do I know what to get, especially if I'm going to be getting a Geforce 3070 in the future.

Get an 80+ Gold (or better) PSU with a 7+ year warranty. Seasonic Focus and Focus Plus Gold lines, Corsair TMx, RMx 2018 and RMx 2019 lines, and EVGA Supernova G1/2/3 lines. 750+ watts.

Forum Joe
Jun 7, 2001

Every day I'm shuffling!

Ask me about Tasmania!

Ok, I've bought a new power supply and a new graphics card (3070 whooo!) but it's still doing it.
Do I just assume it's the motherboard now and replace that as well? Should I take it to a shop?
Are there any diagnostic tools or logs I should be looking at to see if something specific is triggering it?

Forum Joe
Jun 7, 2001

Every day I'm shuffling!

Ask me about Tasmania!

Zogo posted:

If there's nothing in event viewer then using onboard video and/or testing the GPU in another machine will narrow things down.

How old are the GPU and PSU?


Get an 80+ Gold (or better) PSU with a 7+ year warranty. Seasonic Focus and Focus Plus Gold lines, Corsair TMx, RMx 2018 and RMx 2019 lines, and EVGA Supernova G1/2/3 lines. 750+ watts.

Thanks for your help. I should have added the entire system is about 3.5 years old.
I replaced the PSU with a CoolerMaster 80+ Gold PSU with a 5 year warranty, 750w.

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Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



Forum Joe posted:

Do I just assume it's the motherboard now and replace that as well? Should I take it to a shop? Are there any diagnostic tools or logs I should be looking at to see if something specific is triggering it?

If there's nothing in the application and system eventvwr logs then two tests you can try:

Run CDI to check HDD health:
https://osdn.net/projects/crystaldi...Info8_9_0a.exe/

Run Memtest overnight at some point to check RAM health:
http://www.memtest.org/


But it is possible the motherboard has failed.

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