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aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

It looks a little, but not quite, like a Kate. I got nothin'.

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aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

The trick the dambusters used to ensure that they'd drop the bomb from the correct height was kinda clever.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Why is the tail so gigantic on the A400M?

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Is someone looking into making jet fuel from solar / wind energy and, idk, air CO2 and water or something? Seems like that would solve a bunch of problems with storage / buffering weather-related peaks and troughs in production. I assume it's an efficiency / cost problem?

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Imagine living in the world where it happened. "Hey, remember that day America went and killed Russia?" That's gotta put a bit of a dent in your general outlook.

e: who am I kidding, we'd be talking about Bieber and Game of Thrones again five minutes later

aphid_licker fucked around with this message at 20:58 on Sep 8, 2016

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

The coolest thing about the Schneider Cup probably isn't even the planes but the actual trophy, which is roughly house-sized

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

TheFluff posted:

speaking of afterburners, this is some of the best footage of the business end of one I've ever seen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBE41A9VT3Q#t=65s

(and a lot of photo nerds probably agree with me judging by the sound of all the camera shutters going off when it lights up)

Was it the Swedish Air Force that had that mishap where a fighter set a bunch of people who were spectating at the end of the runway on fire? I think the accident report got posted either here or in the cold war thread.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

I guess drawing pictures of an endless succession of ever-wackier planes beats having your job declared nonessential and getting drafted into the latest "planned front adjustment" in the strategically important Slavoveschenskgrad bogs.

About how much, ballpark, would it cost to make a one-off flying example of one of those planes? I get that there mostly never was any actual technical documentation or anything for those things, I just mean a plane that is shaped like that, with a commercial engine of roughly the correct power, and using whatever works in place of those vintage turbojets where applicable. Is that in the millions, tens of millions?

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Wow, I did not expect that it would go quite that high. And yeah, I knew about the Bugatti. Kind of a bummer, those are some visually extremely striking planes.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug


These are basically the aircraft designer equivalent of cutting yourself.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

It would have given them a pretty clear idea of their altitude and the direction the ground is in if it hadn't also killed them

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug


For some reason, quite possibly that I am a gigantic idiot, pics of Cold War Tacti-Golfs always make me really happy.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

C.M. Kruger posted:

Dud rate for the BLU-97 is 7% and 14% for DPICM, so I'd say they're doing pretty good.

Only 1-30% of the fish explode on impact so arguably they have a 70-99% dud rate

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Reading that article I was scared that it was gonna end up as a Byford Dolphin scenario

quote:

Subsequent investigation by forensic pathologists determined Hellevik, being exposed to the highest pressure gradient and in the process of moving to secure the inner door, was forced through the 60 centimetres (24 in) in diameter opening created by the jammed interior trunk door by escaping air and violently dismembered, including bisection of the thoracoabdominal cavity which further resulted in expulsion of all internal organs of the chest and abdomen except the trachea and a section of small intestine and of the thoracic spine and projecting them some distance, one section later being found 10 metres (30 ft) vertically above the exterior pressure door.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

I've gotten some worryingly conflicting info over the years in workplace safety courses about what I should be doing after emptying one of those CO2 fire extinguishers.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

The Italians apparently built six of those four-engine bombers a year which is pretty the_whole_problem_with_the_Axis_war_effort.txt

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Party Plane Jones posted:

Before the accident, the manual arming pin in each of the bombs was in place. Although the pins required horizontal movement for extraction, they were both on a lanyard to allow the crew to pull them from the cockpit. During the breakup, the aircraft experienced structural distortion and torsion in the weapons bay sufficient to pull the pin from one of the bombs, thus arming the Bisch generator.

The idea of arming a nuclear weapon by yanking on a string you draped from your cockpit to the bomb bay is hilarious to me for some reason. If this had been in Dr. Strangelove I would've found it a bit much.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Loving the comically oversized flag.

Vitamin J posted:

There was also the opposite problem that was explained in Command and Control; a few types of bombs had a little foil strip inside the core that acted to absorb neutrons and stop a nuclear detonation. There was some clockwork-like springs and a mechanism that wound the foil strip up and pulled it out of the core when it was to be armed and used.

Unfortunately those little foil piece started corroding and nobody knew until a few decades later when they were decommissioned and it was realized that the mechanism would not work and the foil would not be pulled out and the nuke would not go off. It affected a huge percentage of the US arsenal and would have rendered them all complete duds.

Yeah that one I already had heard about. Would've made for a lot of very surprised Russians.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

HookedOnChthonics posted:

People also may have seen pictures before of the R.I, which had... a unique fuselage shape:




I wanna pet it

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Half the time it's like the Brits are operating on different industrial design and possibly physics principles than the rest of the planet. Also genetic material

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug


What's the aerodynamic or engineering rationale behind making the fuselage shaped sort of tapering into an edge like that instead of more conventionally rounded?

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug


What the gently caress



I love how weird that thing is.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

How does coal dust in the wood glue absorb radar beams?

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug


Imagine the abandon ship drill on that bad boy. 800 lightly radioactive crew.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

I remember a WW2 gun camera film on youtube where the guy is strafing a parked bomber and the perspective is up, ie he is literally closer to the ground than a parked plane. The mishap rate must've been something else.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Buttcoin purse posted:

It's always weird to hear about something that I thought was just a stupid thing we did in Battlefield 1942 actually happened in real life. Next you'll tell me that pilots would intentionally take out lone standing infantry by hitting them with their wings

Or their buddies at the airfield!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UntN_cZUQg8

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

joat mon posted:



For example, the CH-53K is running a combined 22,500 hp from three engines through one gearbox (that makes up almost 40% of the helicopter's weight)

I never really thought about this but between the engines and gearbox a bunch of the weight of a helicopter is basically in its roof, right? What's in the bottom to counterbalance? Or do they just make sure that the fuselage is wide enough so it doesn't tip over?

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Man the French should build more aircraft.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Oh man check out the dents on that leading wing edge.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Idk if it's just the Blue Angels livery but I feel like I've never properly appreciated the looks of the F-18 before. That is a pretty plane.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Sagebrush posted:

K for anti-ship missiles, because the Russians initially classified these missiles with an X, for eXperimental, but the cyrillic X is transliterated as Kh, and NATO picked that because what would an international standard be without one batshit out-of-nowhere spec that doesn't follow any of the logic

Experimental in Russian is экспериментальный, eksperimentalnij, so it makes more sense to me that they just used that K. What you describe would be a corkscrew process of taking the Russian word, translating it, taking the second letter from the translation, looking what Russian letter it sorta looked like, and then transliterating that.

Another source of confusion is that Russian Air-to-surface missiles are designated Kh-[number] in the Russian nomenclature.

http://www.aerospaceweb.org/questio...ons/q0180.shtml

Not gonna lie I have no idea whats going on there.

e: also for some reason the Shipwreck is the P-700 and at this point I just give up

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Read the memoirs of a Russian lady recently and her dad dies when she is a kid in the 80s crashing his helicopter in a drunken joyride with his mistress. That's a bit of an rear end in a top hat move.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Nebakenezzer posted:

He 119 V3 was a seaplane.





Holy poo poo that's sexy

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Airbus just sold a cool $50bn worth of airplanes, holy poo poo

http://money.cnn.com/2017/11/15/new...rder/index.html

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Dannywilson posted:

Nirvana's album Nevermind was written closer to the end of the Vietnam war that it was to today, by nearly a decade.

I remember Vietnam feeling very recent when I was in school back in the late 20th century. I mean it was like 20 years past at that point. Now it's ancient loving history.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

I always crack up at "Spacy"

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Did they manage to make copies of the engines or was performance reduced? I understand that aircraft engines were just as bleeding edge metallurgically etc. for the time back then as they are today.

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug



More like they went there

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

The bleeping on this one alone is a work of art

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLyiL7R_Fms

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aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

kiss kiss



Pillbug

Aeronautical insanity: putting my zeppelin in the hangar

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