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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


wargamerROB posted:

Everyone saying peated malt tastes like rear end: do you like peaty whiskies? Lots of people describe Islay scotches like you're describing peat smoked malt, but I could also see it being way too strong without mellowing in a barrel for 10 years.


I love islay scotch, and I've never liked a beer with peat smoked malt. I'm open to having my mind changed, but I have many doubts.

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Super Rad
Feb 15, 2003
Sir Loin of Beef

wargamerROB posted:

Everyone saying peated malt tastes like rear end: do you like peaty whiskies? Lots of people describe Islay scotches like you're describing peat smoked malt, but I could also see it being way too strong without mellowing in a barrel for 10 years.

I love peated scotches (Laphroig Quarter Cask especially), but IMO the flavor just does not translate well in beers, or at least not in the amounts I had tried using - maybe if you limit yourself to a quarter pound or less per 5 gal it evens out some.

withak
Jan 15, 2003


Fun Shoe

It's probably like coffee. If you aren't that familiar with it then it make an interesting addition but if it is a flavor that you are used to and like a lot then tasting it in combination with beer seems wrong.

Zakath
Mar 22, 2001



Josh Wow posted:

My festbier is 70% Vienna and 30% Munich II and Wyeast Munich lager. The recipe you posted would be fine, but I feel it'd be a more Americanized version. My version isn't quite as good as Ayinger's of course, but it's like 90% there to me. I think if I did a double decoction and maybe did a little more Munich it'd get even closer.
I brewed basically this when you suggested it to me back this summer, and I did a double decoction. It came out really good. The decoction was a huge pain in the rear end, but ultimately worth it I think.

door Door door
Feb 26, 2006

Fugee Face



Guess I'll experiment very cautiously with peated malt once I finally get an all grain setup. Beer might just be too young compared to whisky for the peat to be balanced by other flavors.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007


The best results I've heard of involve 1 or 2 ounces in something hefty. Jo3sh mention Stone's smoked porter which doesn't really taste peaty and just has some phenols hanging out in the back.

Maybe try some experiments with Islay boilermakers.

Josh Wow
Feb 28, 2005

We need more beer up here!


I've had plenty of good beers made with peated malt, you just have to go light on it. I've personally never made one but my buddy makes a killer peat smoked milk stout.

nominal
Oct 13, 2007

I've never tried dried apples.
What are they?


Pork Pro

"I've never had any problems whatsoever sparging", I said. "Maybe I don't need any rice hulls", I said. "It doesn't look very gumnmy", I said. "I can probably empty this just only a little bit slower than everything else", I said.

"Hhahaahahahahaha what the gently caress is wrong with you, you goddamned moron", said the rye malt.

It really only got stuck a few times, but it was my first stuck sparge. Not too bad to deal with, but next time I'll be ready.

fullroundaction
Apr 20, 2007

Drink beer every day


hellfaucet posted:

Going to pour yourself a pint of homebrew from your keg, only to realize one of your dumbfuck friends thought it would be a good idea to turn your CO2 tank all the way up, full pressure, because he wants a "foamy head" over 3 days ago: expensive and annoying as gently caress. Quarter full CO2 tank now completely empty as it is all now in solution in near 15 gallons of beer.

loving morons. Guess i have to have a giant passive aggressive note over my regulator now that says "Don't loving touch you stupid mongoloid."

I'm pretty sure that's just regular aggressive.

Try any of my beers yet? Brewmates ask me every day if you've posted any reviews

hellfaucet
Apr 7, 2009



fullroundaction posted:

I'm pretty sure that's just regular aggressive.

Try any of my beers yet? Brewmates ask me every day if you've posted any reviews

Doing the ringer on them right now actually! Will post tomorrow.

Nateron
Mar 9, 2009

What spit?


A question fr you Goons that shipped beer this holiday, what was/is the best way to ship beer. It would be a six pack of 16oz bottles. UPS, USPS, Fed-Ex?

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



My incredibly late Secret Santa package is in the mail. UPS said expect delivery Thursday. Sorry for the delay, like I said I was out of town for 2 weeks and then my keg system completely took a poo poo.

Angry Grimace posted:

Peat smoked malt tastes like an open grave.

Love this description even though I'm not sure I've ever had a peat malt beer (I do love peaty scotch like Laphroaig).

Nateron posted:

A question fr you Goons that shipped beer this holiday, what was/is the best way to ship beer. It would be a six pack of 16oz bottles. UPS, USPS, Fed-Ex?

Never had any trouble with UPS. Just pack it with tons of bubblewrap and such so it can't move at all or clink against each other. When they ask what's in the package say bottles of hot sauce or olive oil or something, they don't pursue it further. Pretty sure it's straight-up illegal to ship booze via USPS. FedEx is probably the same as UPS but I've never used them personally.

Docjowles fucked around with this message at Jan 13, 2013 around 02:58

wattershed
Dec 27, 2002

Radio got his free iPod, did you get yours???

I feel like a moron even asking this question, but I'm stumped, so here we go...

I started kegging with this setup. I recently chose to add two more kegs, and I bought two more dual gauge regulators to put in the line for a total of four.

Basically, when I attach one of the new regulators, no matter which angle I start screwing in the connector piece at to the existing regs, when it's straight up and down (as the other regulators are), it's not tight enough, and when it's very, very tight it's oriented to where the face of the gauge is about 135° tighter than the existing regulators.

If that doesn't make sense, here's a photo. The new regs are on the right:


The problem child is really only the 3rd one from the left...the far right one will line up with whatever it's connected to, which is why it's aligned just fine with the 3rd one. I've tried other orders of them, putting the weird one first, last, whatever, and it always ends up about 135° tighter than every other regulator.

Any ideas on how the hell to solve for this would be awesome. I just want them all pretty

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Add more teflon tape so it tightens earlier. Also, threads always engage at the same spot, so trying to thread it on from different starting angles isn't helping



If that doesn't work, then get a union fitting.

wattershed
Dec 27, 2002

Radio got his free iPod, did you get yours???

Hypnolobster posted:

Add more teflon tape so it tightens earlier. Also, threads always engage at the same spot, so trying to thread it on from different starting angles isn't helping



If that doesn't work, then get a union fitting.

Of course, about 10 minutes after posting I solved it by using a second wrench. Was only using one up to this point, needed some torque on the other side of the "bad" regulator. I burned through so much teflon tape today, good thing a mile of it costs about ten cents.

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'


College Slice

An abrupt end to my homebrewing hobby (until I can move) or "Wait a second that doesn't smell like hops".





The stove just can't take the prolonged heat with 3 gallons on it. This happened 5 minutes into the boil on the second batch I made with this stove (first was months ago), and I checked all the connections before hand and that is a new OEM burner element and a thoroughly inspected socket that I installed when I moved into my apartment. Short of ripping the stove apart to install a canning element and associated controls and hoping that would be able to handle it (no guarantees) I'm SOL. Good news is I have the old parts so I can swap it back without the apartment company knowing anything was up

I would just say "gently caress it" and pitch but there is honey in this recipe and I know it would be infected with wild beasties.

Jo3sh
Oct 19, 2002

Like all girls I love unicorns!

Honey is pretty sanitary, actually. If the options are "try it and see what happens" and "throw it away," I think it's pretty clear you should at least give it a shot. It may not be the best thing in the world, but at least you will know.

For the record, I made mead with 15 pounds of honey, no hops, and no boil or chemical sterilant at all. it's loving excellent.

Sirotan
Oct 17, 2006

Sirotan is a seal.


Ham Wrangler

Heres a question maybe I already know the answer to: I'm about to transfer Babby's First Sour to secondary. I have a 5gal and 6gal carboy. It's a 5gal batch with 2lbs of currants that will be added to it. Normally I'd just think to use the 6gal, but the wrinkle is using it on my first ever batch of beer I sort of...melted it. The bottle's shape is a little deformed but probably would hold liquid just fine. But do I want to risk it for 6+ months? Could there be an issue of air permeation or something else? Should I buy a new one or just use the 5gal and maybe toss a little beer?

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'


College Slice

Jo3sh posted:

Honey is pretty sanitary, actually. If the options are "try it and see what happens" and "throw it away," I think it's pretty clear you should at least give it a shot. It may not be the best thing in the world, but at least you will know.

For the record, I made mead with 15 pounds of honey, no hops, and no boil or chemical sterilant at all. it's loving excellent.

Yeah, I went ahead and cooled it, transferred it to the primary and pitched. We'll see! If anything bad is in there it will have to compete with the very vigorous starter I made.

Also it wsa originally going to be a tweaked kolsch, so now I need to think up an angry German name. This week has just been poo poo: I got hit by a car while biking and now I can't make beer.

Shifty Pony fucked around with this message at Jan 13, 2013 around 18:34

Cointelprofessional
Jul 2, 2007
Carrots: Make me an offer.

Sirotan posted:

Heres a question maybe I already know the answer to: I'm about to transfer Babby's First Sour to secondary. I have a 5gal and 6gal carboy. It's a 5gal batch with 2lbs of currants that will be added to it. Normally I'd just think to use the 6gal, but the wrinkle is using it on my first ever batch of beer I sort of...melted it. The bottle's shape is a little deformed but probably would hold liquid just fine. But do I want to risk it for 6+ months? Could there be an issue of air permeation or something else? Should I buy a new one or just use the 5gal and maybe toss a little beer?

I wouldn't use a bottle like that untested. If you had done any water trials with it to see how it holds up, then maybe. I wouldn't risk something as long as a sour on chance. Sours are a roll of the dice which is why you want to control as many variables as you can.

The two lbs shouldn't displace that much liquid. When I did a blueberry lambic, 10 lbs of blue berries only contributed about a gallon in my 6 gallon carboy. You will probably see some renewed fermentation, so you may want to rig a blow off tube in the short term after you add the currants. Or if you live near a homebrew store, just pony up and buy another 6 gallon carboy. It'll be something you can dedicate to sours in the future so to me it's an easy investment. Buying the equivalent in commercial sour beers would cost you $500+, so spending $35 on a new carboy is a much easier pill to swallow.

Sirotan
Oct 17, 2006

Sirotan is a seal.


Ham Wrangler

Cointelprofessional posted:

I wouldn't use a bottle like that untested. If you had done any water trials with it to see how it holds up, then maybe. I wouldn't risk something as long as a sour on chance. Sours are a roll of the dice which is why you want to control as many variables as you can.

The two lbs shouldn't displace that much liquid. When I did a blueberry lambic, 10 lbs of blue berries only contributed about a gallon in my 6 gallon carboy. You will probably see some renewed fermentation, so you may want to rig a blow off tube in the short term after you add the currants. Or if you live near a homebrew store, just pony up and buy another 6 gallon carboy. It'll be something you can dedicate to sours in the future so to me it's an easy investment. Buying the equivalent in commercial sour beers would cost you $500+, so spending $35 on a new carboy is a much easier pill to swallow.

Yeah I haven't used it since that first batch. I was thinking of being lazy and just using the 5gal, but buying a new 6gal is probably the better choice in the long run. I guess I'll hop over the the homebrew store before they close!

Edit: haha wow ok I guess it was way worse than I thought. Let's play "Guess the melted carboy!"



Sirotan fucked around with this message at Jan 13, 2013 around 19:38

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Shifty Pony posted:

Yeah, I went ahead and cooled it, transferred it to the primary and pitched. We'll see! If anything bad is in there it will have to compete with the very vigorous starter I made.

Also it wsa originally going to be a tweaked kolsch, so now I need to think up an angry German name. This week has just been poo poo: I got hit by a car while biking and now I can't make beer.

You could always give heatsticks a shot for boiling instead of your stove.

Eco RI
Nov 4, 2008

NOM NOM NOM OM NOM



Has anyone conditioned with Belgian Dark Candi Syrup or D2? I'm about to condition a 3 gallon Pious 12 batch, but I don't feel like the syrup I used in the boil scaled down sufficiently. Is it going to cause any issues or will conditioning likely go ahead predictably?

WaffleStomp
May 7, 2007


I posted this in the beer thread but got no bites, so maybe this more applies to the homebrewer goons.

A new brewpub opened up near where I live a few months ago, and each time I've gone, once at opening, with a return trip this weekend, every beer I tried had a thin, watery mouthfeel to it. I tried their IPA, esb, and various stouts, served on tap, cask, and nitro, and each and every glass had the same watery thin mouthfeel to it, which reminded me of my experimentations with extract homebrewing. After poking around on their site a bit, the brewpub states that they use no extract in their batches, so I'm assuming they're doing all grain.

What else would cause their beer to basically taste like beer flavored water? It's a shame too, because it's a nice establishment, but their beer definitely suffers because of this.

crazyfish
Sep 19, 2002



Eco RI posted:

Has anyone conditioned with Belgian Dark Candi Syrup or D2? I'm about to condition a 3 gallon Pious 12 batch, but I don't feel like the syrup I used in the boil scaled down sufficiently. Is it going to cause any issues or will conditioning likely go ahead predictably?

Don't bother. The flavour contribution from your priming sugar is generally miniscule, so don't use anything but plain old table sugar or conditioning drops. That candi syrup is ridiculously expensive; don't waste it.

Nateron posted:

A question fr you Goons that shipped beer this holiday, what was/is the best way to ship beer. It would be a six pack of 16oz bottles. UPS, USPS, Fed-Ex?

Random musings on the internet say that it is actually explicitly illegal to ship alcohol via USPS (though I've never read the statutes myself). Even if it were legal, I wouldn't ship USPS because their tracking blows. UPS and FedEx actually only allow licensed shippers to ship alcohol, however in practice they don't give a poo poo outside of some random employees. The best way is to pack your box very very well (everything wrapped in bubble wrap with tons of padding all around), setup an account with UPS or FedEx that allows you to print shipping labels at home, and bring your box to the store and say you've already printed the label. They just take it from you. No interrogation, no bullshit.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



WaffleStomp posted:

What else would cause their beer to basically taste like beer flavored water? It's a shame too, because it's a nice establishment, but their beer definitely suffers because of this.

It could be a bunch of things really. To name a few: using a really, really low mash temperature, lovely water supply and not adjusting for it, brewing really low gravity beers even when that's not appropriate for the style (like a 4% IPA or something), cutting corners on the recipes (you could easily throw in some dextrin malt or oats to fill out the mouthfeel), or even an early stage infection that doesn't fully develop into nasty flavors because the keg gets consumed quickly.

Jo3sh
Oct 19, 2002

Like all girls I love unicorns!

WaffleStomp posted:

What else would cause their beer to basically taste like beer flavored water? It's a shame too, because it's a nice establishment, but their beer definitely suffers because of this.

Sounds to me like they are mashing too low and/or cutting the recipes down for economy and/or using less expensive but less tasty malt.

What are the stated ABVs on their beers? I am absolutely not saying that a 4% beer can't be delicious, but that a 4% beer has its own challenges and won't be as good as it can be if the brewing process is based on a 6% beer. Do you live in Utah or another area with odd laws about beer and alcohol? They may have been forced to scale down their recipes to comply with regulations.

the yellow dart
Jul 19, 2004

King of rings, armlocks, hugs, and our hearts

For bottling purposes, is it ok to use bottles that came from beers with brett or will whatever beasties in there brett up whatever I put in it? Those beers don't make up a ton of my empties but I'm just curious to know what the best course of action would be or how much I would have to worry.

ChickenArise
May 12, 2010

POWER
= MEAT +
OPPORTUNITY
= BATTLEWORMS


crazyfish posted:

Random musings on the internet say that it is actually explicitly illegal to ship alcohol via USPS (though I've never read the statutes myself).

A bill to change this has passed the Senate, but not yet the House. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/112/s1789/text

And Regarding FedEx, one of the shops I went to told me I had to open the package for them before mailing it; when they saw that it was beer, they told me I had to go to the FedEx hub (non-retail outlet) if I wanted to ship beer. It was a weird interaction, but UPS was across the street and done in minutes.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



the yellow dart posted:

For bottling purposes, is it ok to use bottles that came from beers with brett or will whatever beasties in there brett up whatever I put in it? Those beers don't make up a ton of my empties but I'm just curious to know what the best course of action would be or how much I would have to worry.

You should be able to thoroughly sanitize glass, they should be fine. Just give them a nice long soak in Star San or whatever you use.

WaffleStomp
May 7, 2007


Jo3sh posted:

Sounds to me like they are mashing too low and/or cutting the recipes down for economy and/or using less expensive but less tasty malt.

What are the stated ABVs on their beers? I am absolutely not saying that a 4% beer can't be delicious, but that a 4% beer has its own challenges and won't be as good as it can be if the brewing process is based on a 6% beer. Do you live in Utah or another area with odd laws about beer and alcohol? They may have been forced to scale down their recipes to comply with regulations.

Their IPA was 6%, and their other brews range between 4-6% as well. I'm located in the Philly area, and every other brewpub and brewery in this area, let alone the state, has never pumped out a beer with such thin mouthfeel as this brewpub, which is Vault Brewing Company In Yardley, PA. There are two other breweries that are within 15 miles of Vault and they have never, to the best of my knowledge, had issues when it came to mouthfeel.

Jo3sh
Oct 19, 2002

Like all girls I love unicorns!

Then it's probably a procedural problem or related to their recipes. Kind of a shame. There's hope that they will figure it out, but probably not a large one.

WaffleStomp
May 7, 2007


Definitely a shame, as their building looks awesome on the inside and their food is pretty unique and good. I know it's not me either because I took a friend there who isn't a huge beer guy and even he noticed what I did.

Zakath
Mar 22, 2001



Jo3sh posted:

Then it's probably a procedural problem or related to their recipes. Kind of a shame. There's hope that they will figure it out, but probably not a large one.
The first of several new microbreweries in my city (and actually the only one open so far) is having quality issues too. Went there shortly after they first opened, they had some pretty solid offerings, and I even bought a growler. I've been there a couple times since, and pretty much all of their beers have a sour tinge to them, including the varieties they had on tap when they first opened.

I really wanted them to do well, but I've decided not to go back there until I hear they have their act together. Thankfully, there are 5-6 breweries in the area slated for opening this year.

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'


College Slice

Hypnolobster posted:

You could always give heatsticks a shot for boiling instead of your stove.

I considered that, or even going ahead and making an electric kettle using a spare keggle. However I am going to move this summer and will get back use of my propane burner and all grain setup. I will just try a bunch of new local brews instead.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Shifty Pony posted:

I will just try a bunch of new local brews instead.

A tragic problem to have.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



WaffleStomp posted:

Definitely a shame, as their building looks awesome on the inside and their food is pretty unique and good. I know it's not me either because I took a friend there who isn't a huge beer guy and even he noticed what I did.

Places can definitely survive on great food and mediocre beer, for better or worse. Coopersmith's in my town is a brewpub with really awesome food but their beer suuuuuuuucks. There's still like an hour+ wait for a table on many weekends and they can seat a huge number of people. I actually like to go there when I'm working on weight loss because I can get a baller salad and not be tempted even a little bit to drink

internet celebrity
Jun 23, 2006


College Slice

Is there a good straightforward guide anywhere for making unpasteurized fruit mead with fresh fruit? I'm looking for something that tells me when/why to use campden, pectic enzyme, and all that other stuff.

Marshmallow Blue
Apr 25, 2010


internet celebrity posted:

Is there a good straightforward guide anywhere for making unpasteurized fruit mead with fresh fruit? I'm looking for something that tells me when/why to use campden, pectic enzyme, and all that other stuff.

From what I remember of "The Compleat Meadmaker" by Ken Schramm - He suggests adding fruit after fermentation has pretty much wound up and then racking onto your fruit. The alcohol takes care of any buggers. I have a strawberry raspberry melomel which is very tasty at the moment but is very hazy in the carboy (but much clearer in a glass). You don't have to use clearing agents is you don't want to (unless your going to a contest or show) but from what I know, cloudiness is the only problem from pectin (correct me if I'm wrong).

Campden will stop your yeast form reproducing because of the added sugars and potentially exploding your wine bottles. Or if you use a High tolerance yeast and want some residual sugars. Stop it with the tablets then add your fruit for some residual sweetness.

EDIT: Also you will really only have a pectin problem if you boil the fruit which is what I did with mine because it went into the primary, but if you go in secondary, you shouldn't need to worry about boiling your fresh fruits (maybe a cold water rinse?)

Marshmallow Blue fucked around with this message at Jan 14, 2013 around 17:58

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Angry Grimace
Jul 29, 2010

ACTUALLY IT IS VERY GOOD THAT THE SHOW IS BAD AND ANYONE WHO DOESN'T REALIZE WHY THAT'S GOOD IS AN IDIOT. JUST ENJOY THE BAD SHOW INSTEAD OF THINKING.


I had a home brew dream last night that I went to take a hydro sample of my Imperial IPA and forgot to sanitize the thief. Serious nightmares.

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