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The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars



Banner By Nondescript Van

Welcome to the new 2017 edition Keyboard Megathread! A lot has changed in the world of keyboards since the last OP in 2009 and it was just about time for a reboot. If you’re looking for quick picks for your couch media setup or don’t want to bother with this mechanical keyboard business, skip right to section 8. If you’re looking for recommendations on entry level mechanical keyboards, go to section 9. And remember:

Slurps Mad Rips posted:

Just wait until you have friends begging you to not buy another keycap set or keyboard. Tears rolling down their face with each key press as you enter your credit card information and click purchase. You'll start to scratch hatch marks into your old CODE keycaps to count the days until the signature plastics run completes. 3 months after your purchase you'll buy another keyboard. You'll tell yourself the typical lies "This is my end game", "I'm a millennial. Why save for the American dream when I can have a rewarding hobby instead?", and "I won't NEED to buy another keyboard after this". But you will. You'll always buy one. Your friends won't try to stop you. They're long gone. They lost you when you dropped 4 grand on an Signature Plastics SA Avocado Toast themed keycap set so that the group buy wouldn't fail. It won't even arrive until 2023. But it doesn't matter. You've become a true keeb weeb.

You have been warned.

Table of Contents

1. What Is A Mechanical Keyboard?
2. Why Should I Buy A Mechanical Keyboard?
3. Keyboard Jargon
4. PS/2 vs. USB
5. Switches
6. Keyboard Sizes
7. Should I Buy This Keyboard?
8. Non-Mechanical Quick Picks
9. Mechanical Quick Picks
10. Links And Resources



1. What Is A Mechanical Keyboard?

Most keyboards on the market use something called “rubber dome over membrane" designs. When you press a keycap you squish a small rubber dome inside, and it presses two membrane sheets together to complete a circuit. They work, but they’re not great. For one thing, they feel a little bit like typing on pudding. For another they can harden or soften as they age, changing the amount of force needed to actuate the key or killing the key outright. Rubber dome keyboards don’t last that long compared to mechanical keyboards either. The average rubber dome is rated for two million keystrokes. Cherry switches are rated for fifty million.


Pictured: A diagram of a Cherry MX Red actuating.

Mechanical keyboards typically (but not always) have you pressing down on a spring, and once you hit the key’s actuation point it completes a circuit with a small metal leaf attached to the switch itself. This makes them more reliable, responsive, and just outright better feeling.

2. Why Should I Buy A Mechanical Keyboard?

The same reason you buy a good pair of shoes.

Yeah you can get by with something for twenty dollars from Wal-Mart, but it's just getting by. If you're reading this thread you're probably a programmer or IT person, or someone who just generally uses computers often. And computer use is at it's core, keyboard driven. Mechanical keyboards help you type faster, more accurately, and more comfortably which makes the whole cycle of using a computer easier and more satisfying. And honestly, it just feels good. There's something about the way crunchy switches feel under your fingers, the click when a switch hits it's actuation point. It’s satisfying in a way a cheaper keyboard never can be. And there's so much customization, a keyboard can be as unassuming or bold as you like. You can buy a 70 dollar Magicforce 68 and get along just fine or construct monster that looks like a decker’s wet dream. Just look at some of these awesome things:


By Weedle

Weedle posted:

KBParadise V60 with Tai Hao Miami keycaps and custom cable from mechcables.com.


By Wasabi The J


By Nondescript Van

Nondescript Van posted:

well as for customizing, there is a lot you could do, such as buy a pcb in a groupbuy from korea, buy some hard to find (at the time) MX White switches from some dude in Germany, then never finish your own case




By Brightman

Brightman posted:

I got a WASD V2 with Browns that I customized on their site, some keys being blank was an error on my part when futzing with the template but it works out (unless anyone else is typing on it).Of course having that at home for a few months made my work keyboard feel like poo poo (a cautionary tale?) so I got a CODE with Clears and got some Vortex PBT Doubleshot keys in company colors. I did get an F8 key for this a bit after I took the photos, so no more double F9s. The main issue with those keys now is being white they show dust really well, so keeping them looking clean is futile. Well that and the backlights don't really work out with them but I don't really care about backlighting, especially at work.


By unpronounceable

unpronounceable posted:

This is a Cooler Master Quickfire XT with browns. I was pretty boring with the custom caps since I have little colour sense, but I really like the front printing.


By The Deadly Hume

The Deadly Hume posted:

OK, keycap porn - this is quite an old image, from not long after I got hooked into this stupid hobby. To begin with I got about three different coloured Tai-Hao sets and cobbled together this monstrosity.


By Brownie

Brownie posted:

So my MAX KEYS Miami SA doubleshot ABS set came in today and it feels great! Really happy with it on my poker 3 with clears. So thanks for the help guys, you were right and these key caps don't feel cheap at all.

ugh i'm going to be so poor because of this loving hobby weird obsession

If you post your own custom board, I may add it here! (with your permission)

3. Keyboard Jargon

There’s a fuckload of buzzwords in this weird little hobby, and this is just some basic terminology so you know what we’re talking about.

Switch: The bit you’re actually using to type. When you press a keycap you’re actuating the switch under it.

Linear Switch: Linear switches just go straight up and down. There’s no tactile feedback except bottoming out the switch.

Tactile Switch: Tactile switches have a small “bump” around the actuation point, and release a soft clicking noise. The most popular sort of switch.

Clicky Switch: When you think of mechanical keyboards, you’re probably thinking of something with a clicky switch. Like tactile switches there’s a “bump” but it feels a bit crunchier and instead of a softer clicking noise they release a loud, sharp click. Really lets you share the joy of mechanical keyboards or annoy the poo poo out of people because they’re noisy as hell.

cN: Centinewton, the unit of force used to describe how hard you have to press a switch to actuate it. The lightest mechanical switches tend to be 30 to 40 cN, and the heaviest are around 90 cN. Rubber dome keyboards are usually around 60 cN. If a keyboard lists it’s actuation force in grams they’re roughly (within about 2%) equal to cN.


Pictured: A Plank Ortholinear Keyboard. Most of us think they’re silly too.

100/80/60/40%: Shorthand for a keyboards overall size. What this means is expanded on in Section 6.

ABS: The most common type of plastic used to make keycaps. Most mechanical keyboards you buy will have Doubleshot ABS keycaps standard. ABS keycaps tend to lose their texture quickly, and become smooth and slimy feeling.

PBT: The good poo poo when it comes to keycaps. If you want to improve your keyboard, buying PBT keycaps is an excellent first step. PBT keycaps last longer, muffle the sound of the keystroke a little bit, and don’t yellow with age like ABS. Doubleshot PBT is best, and dye sublimation techniques make the longest lasting legends on it. Hydro printing makes for flashy keys, but wears out quickly.


Pictured: WASD O-Rings

O-Rings: Mechanical keyboards are generally loud little fuckers, sometimes by design and sometimes just as a quirk of their engineering. And sometimes your roommates, co-workers, or spouses just can’t take it. O-Rings are one of the simplest solutions, a little piece of rubber placed on the keycaps stem to make the downstroke quieter. However, they make the keypress much “squishier” and the general consensus is it fucks up the whole typing experience. Not as popular these days because there are new solutions coming out like sound dampening clamps or specially designed quiet switches.

Stem: Where switch and keycap meet. Generally the stem will match the switch type – Cherry and clones will have Cherry stems, and Topre switches will have Topre stems. Exceptions exist though, there is at least one model of Topre keyboard with Cherry stems, for example.

Stabilizer: Longer keys, such as shift, enter, and the space bar will have stabilizers under them. With Cherry and Cherry clones they will usually be either Cherry style stabilizers, which are simply empty stems, or Costar stabilizers, which are a thin metal rod.

Rollover: How many keys you can press at once and be sure the system is registering them all. 6 key rollover is common on cheaper boards, and most better boards have 20 or N-key rollover. You’ll know if this matters to you.

4. PS/2 VS USB

In the past, this mattered a lot more. BIOS fuckery often required a PS/2 keyboard, and N-Key Rollover was mostly a PS/2 affair. Nowadays, most BIOS are fine with USB keyboards and N-Key Rollover is available on higher end USB keyboards.

5. Switches

There are three major types of switches I’ll talk about in detail here, they’ll cover about 90% of the keyboards you see on the internet. Cherry, and Cherry clones, Matias and Alps clones, and Topre switches. No matter the switch, I strongly encourage you to try before you buy. Trying an actual keyboard is best, but that's not always possible - that's why some companies make switch testers.There are switch testers for Cherry and Matias (Looks like they've gone out of business, sorry!). Sorry there was only one Topre tester on the market, and seems to be out of production now. If you live in LA you can stop by Elitekeyboards to try out Topre switches, but that’s the best I can offer you.

Cherry

Cherry and Cherry clone switches are easily at least half the market, or maybe even 2/3rds of it. They’re the standard all other switches are compared to. You can identify Cherry and Cherry clone switches by their plus-shaped stems. They’re divided into three major lines I’ll go over. The linear line, the tactile line, and the clicky line.

Cherry Linear Switches



Examples: Cherry MX Red (45 cN), Cherry MX Black (60 cN)

The simplest mechanical switches. They just go straight up and down when you press, with no tactile feedback until you bottom out the switch. This makes them a little bit quieter as Cherry switches go, but noise level varies based on keyboard design. Linear mechanical switches are very easy to accidentally press, as the trigger force is low and there is no tactile feedback to stop the key’s actuation. This is especially true of the Cherry MX Red, which only has an actuation force of 45 cN.

Cherry Tactile Switches



Examples: Cherry MX Brown (45 cN), Cherry MX Clear (60 cN)

Tactile switches incorporate a small “bump” when you hit their actuation point and a soft click. They can be a bit louder than linear switches, but not very in most cases. (Once again, keyboard construction plays a big role) Tactile Cherry switches are the most popular type of mechanical switches, and you can find virtually any mechanical keyboard with Cherry MX Browns or clones of them. Goons typically recommend the Cherry MX Clear, a somewhat heavier version of the Brown.

Cherry Clicky Switches



Examples: Cherry MX Blue (50 cN), Cherry MX Green (80 cN)

Made to emulate the feel and sound of IBM’s buckling spring keyboards, Clicky switches have the bump of tactile switches (though somewhat crunchier, at least in my experience), but add separate piece of plastic that loudly strikes the bottom of the switch housing when it actuates. This gives them a very loud, sharp click. When you’re thinking of mechanical keyboards you’re probably thinking of someone on a Cherry MX Blue keyboard hitting a 100 WPM and making an unholy racket. As a small note, if you play twitch games you might want to avoid clicky switches. They take a little bit longer to recover from their last input than other Cherry switches. For the average user this probably doesn’t matter, but it’s worth noting.

There are more Cherry switches, a lot more, but they’re all based on these three archetypes.

A Quick Word On Cherry Clones

Cherry clones are extremely common, especially on lower quality mechanical keyboards but they’re not all bad. If you want a very specific switch weight and feel there’s probably a Cherry clone set up just the way you like it.

Good: Gateron, KBTalking, Zealio, Kalih

Meh: Greentech, Razer

Nope: Otemu

Matias/Alps Clones

Matias are the largest producer of Alps clone switches. Alps switches were switches similar in design to Cherry switches produced by a Japanese company, Alps Electric. They were well regarded, and when they left the mechanical keyboard business clones sprang up quickly. Matias and Alps clone switches have rectangular stems with two nubs on each side. Outside that, Alps clones can vary wildly and I will only be describing the three switches produced by Matias for simplicity’s sake.

The Matias Linear has a red stem and is similar to the Cherry MX Red, as they have the same linear action and both require 35 cN of force to actuate. The only major difference is the Matias Linear is somewhat quieter. The Matias Quiet Click has a gray stem and is a quieter equivalent to the Cherry MX Clear, requiring the same actuation force of 60 cN but feeling more like a Cherry MX Blue. The Matias Click has a white stem and is similar to the Blue or Green switches of Cherry but the sound of the a keystroke is even louder.

Topre



Topre switches rely on a unique mechanism somewhat similar to the design of rubber dome keyboards. Under each key is a rubber cup fitted over a small coiled conical spring. They have a very small bump towards the top of the keystroke and then smooth sailing. When the key bottoms it produces a distinctive, quiet thock that, to me at least, sounds a bit like rain on a roof. They come in 35g (about 35 cN), 45g (about 45 cN), and 55g (about 55 cN). Topre switches have round stems.

Buckling Spring

A beloved older design, the IBM Buckling Spring switch is a bit of an odd duck. Most mechanical keyboards use springs that compress under pressure. Instead, a buckling spring bends outwardly, striking the side of it’s housing when it reaches it’s required actuation force. The heaviest switch you’re likely to ever encounter, at a whooping 90 cN. And as a bonus, when someone tries to murder you for the racket these things make, you can use the keyboard as a bludgeon to murder them because they are built like loving Gameboys. Unicomp is the only company producing new buckling spring keyboards right now.

6. Keyboard Sizes

Pictured from Top To Bottom, a 100% keyboard, 80% keyboard, 60% keyboard, and 40%. The monster on the bottom right is an Ergodox. Props to Nondescript Van for providing this image.

The other major factor in picking out a mechanical keyboard is the size. There are a lot of little oddities in each category but mechanical keyboards generally fit into a few size classes: 100%, 80%, 60%, and 40%.

100%

This generally refers to fullsize keyboards. The greatest variety of mechanical keyboards exist at this size, and you can generally find any set of features you like in this size class. They also tend to be the heaviest, least portable boards, as well as the priciest.

80%

80% keyboards (more commonly referred to as "TKL" or "Tenkeyless") generally remove the numpad, drastically cutting down the frame’s size and weight. They’re great if you want to keep more desk space open to you and don’t use your numpad very often. You can almost always find the same features of a 100% in an 80%, and for a little less too. There are some 80% keyboards that have alternative configurations, such as removing the six key cluster and arrow cluster and retaining the numpad.

60%

60% keyboards usually cut off the arrow cluster, six key cluster, and function row. Because they remove so many keys, almost all 60% keyboards have macros to access them through function keys, usually replacing one or both of the shortcut keys in the bottom row and firmware or external software for programming macros. You can generally find 60% keyboards with quality construction a little bit cheaper than 100% or 80% keyboards, and they’re highly portable.

40%

The smallest category of mechanical keyboards in more than one way. 40% keyboards cut the number row and adopt shortened keys to obtain the smallest frame possible. There are basically two choices at the size, the Vortex CORE and the Planck Ortholinear Keyboard DIY kit (pictured earlier in the article). The CORE is the more traditional of the two. The Planck almost completely eschews larger keys, leaving only an option for a double or single key length spacebar. The concept behind the behind doing this is to make every key be equidistant from a finger, minimizing finger strain.

7. Should I Buy This Keyboard?

This is general shopping advice for any mechanical keyboard, if you want quick picks you can keep scrolling. There’s a few big companies that consistently put out great boards you should start with these companies. if you don’t know quite what you want these are good companies to start with: Vortex, Varmillo, Code/WASD, MK, Matias, Topre, Leopold, and Ducky

What the frame is made of? Cheap plastic? Aluminum? High grade plastic? It’s a keyboard and you’re a fuckin goon, it’s gonna get messy. So check how difficult reviewers say it is to clean. The other major thing that’s often overlooked is the backplate. The backplate is the bit of the keyboard your switches are actually mounted on. The backplate material determines how much the keyboard moves under each keystroke, how much the keyboard flexes. Flex is the quiet killer of a quality typing experience, there’s no use paying for mechanical switches if the keyboard frame is going to bend under every keypress. Plastic is the worst, aluminum is middle of the road, and steel is best.

Also pay attention to the way the USB plug fits into the keyboard, some keyboards incorporate 90 degree turns for whatever reason and it will murder your cables if you move the keyboard too often. If you’re buying a 60% or 40% keyboard, check out the macro programming and it’s shortcuts before you buy and make sure you at least understand the basics. If it’s an RGB keyboard that relies on firmware over an external app, make sure you understand it.

8. Non-Mechanical Quick Picks

You don’t want a mechanical keyboard? Just getting something to use on the couch for your media setup? That’s cool. This section is for you.

The Logitech K400 has an integrated trackpad if you’re into those. Pretty reliable. 27 USD

The Logitech K360 is a little bit cheaper if you don’t particularly care for the trackpad. 20 USD

The HP K3500 will get you by if you want a 100% sized wireless keyboard. 30 USD, 15 with Prime.


9. Mechanical Quick Picks

These are some good starter boards. I tried to pick something from each of the major size categories. If nothing stands out to you, you can always ask the thread for more advice. You should still use a switch tester or even better, use an actual mechanical keyboard, before you buy anything if you can.


The Magicforce 68 70 USD

The cheapest keyboard I’m going to recommend here. 70 USD from Amazon right now, and Massdrop will often run drops closer to 50. It has a decent aluminum frame, and pretty alright construction for something this cheap. You can find it with Cherry Blues, Reds, and Browns. Massdrops of it have a much wider variety of selectable switches, including Greens, Blacks, and Gateron clones. You can get them somewhat cheaper with Otemu switches at your own peril.


WASD 104 Key with Cherry MX Clears 165 USD, more with options

One of the most commonly recommended keyboards in thread. The fullsize WASD board with Cherry MX Clears is a drat fine way to start your keyboard collection.


The Ducky One 2 Skyline 100 USD

Equipped with Ducky build quality and handsome PBT keycaps, this is an excellent 100% keyboard if you can't or don't want to pay the price for a WASD.


Ducky One 2 Mini RGB 100 USD, depending on switches/LEDs

A superlative little 60% if you want something flashy and for a reasonable price of 100 USD. It has RGB lighting and Ducky's excellent construction.

10. Links And Resources

The Deskthority Wiki – A great source of information on various switches. If you see some screwball switch you can’t ID, it’s probably listed here.

Mechanicalkeyboards.com – The biggest retailer for mechanical keyboards and their accessories in the USA. Has fast, free shipping on most keyboards, an excellent selection, and a decent support department.

MyKeyboard.eu - A European alternative to MK.com. Their selection isn't as good and you can only buy with PayPal, but the shipping rates are much less murderous for those of you across the Atlantic.

Massdrop – A bulk buy site that can often get you good prices on amazing boards, flashy keycaps, and various other accessories. The shipping times are murderous, and their customer support is not great though.

zFrontier - A new groupbuy site inspired by Massdrop. They mostly sell keycaps, they've been getting good reviews from goons so far.

Max Keyboard's Layout Charts - Alternate layouts are common in mechanical keyboards, and it's good to check your layout before you buy custom keycaps.

- Various keycap profiles.

The Unlife Aquatic fucked around with this message at 01:41 on Jun 18, 2019

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The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Reserved for future use.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


This is a good start, but I'd like to come back and add to this. I'd like to do a bit on DIY kits (ergodox, whitefox, some resources on how to put a KB together on your own) and get a little more in depth on customization. There were some new custom keycap selling/massbuy sites I didn't get and I'll add them if you post them. Maybe expand the bit on decent membrane keyboards.

I'd also love to add anyone's customized keyboard to the OP, with a little quote if you like.

The Unlife Aquatic fucked around with this message at 01:36 on Jun 30, 2017

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Do it and I'll clean it up and add it to either the OP or the second post with thanks to you for your help.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Wasabi the J posted:

I forgot my keeb was in the OP.

It's a drat fine keyboard too.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


axeil posted:

Hey guys,

Thanks all for your help in the old thread. After I got my switch tester today I decided I really like the soft feel of the MX Reds so I got a Ducky Shine 6 with Cherry MX Red caps. Excited for it to show up!

Excellent, I used to have a Corsair K70 RGB with Reds for gaming. They're a really great switch if you just absolutely want the smoothest, fastest keystroke.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Hed posted:

Thanks for the thread! The Matias switch tester link in the OP seems to 404 for me and I don't see it on that site's store at all.

Thanks, marked as busted for now. I'll see if I can find another Matias tester.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars



So expensive, yet so beautiful.

I'm tempted.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


The Deadly Hume posted:

I should point out that the base set on this looks very versatile, whereas on a lot of drops if you want to cover a full-size keyboard you pretty much have to get the base set, a modifier set and a numpad set which ends up costing about the same.

So yeah, if you just want to get enough keys for a TKL or 60% there's a bit of excess keys but once the drop opens and the breakpoint pricing kicks in it'll get a bit more reasonable.

Personally I'm done with buying new sets for a while, considering I've got one in transit and another still being nutted out.

OK, keycap porn - this is quite an old image, from not long after I got hooked into this stupid hobby. To begin with I got about three different coloured Tai-Hao sets and cobbled together this monstrosity.


If you've got a standard ANSI set, the Tai-Hao sets are quite suitable to start off with - doubleshot ABS (so they may get a bit shint) and I have to say I did quite like the chunky profile and the way I could put together an eyebleeding layout for not too much cost.

And as has been mentioned above, Tai-Hao have some interesting colour schemes to go with their single colour sets as well.

I call this color scheme "Twin Peaks Hospital Food".

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


The Deadly Hume posted:

Just noticed some people call their mechanical keyboards "clackers", gah. They don't know what that sounds like to an Australian.

It sounds like the name of a horror movie monster.

"Don't go near the vent! The clackers will get you!"

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


That DSA Granite set is loving gorgeous.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Ultimate Mango posted:

Hey OP, thanks for the new thread. I really liked the CODE several years ago and ended up getting two of them. Love the Cherry Clears and backlighting. And promptly forgot about the keyboard thread and Massdrop and the fantasy of making an Ergodox.

And now a new thread and a new OP and I see I can get a keyboard with Cherry Clears or Cherry Milky(!) and color changing LED surround lights and key lighting that is responsive or does cool poo poo all the time. drat, it's a good time to like keyboards. Too bad my CODES will last longer than I will.

Thank you, I put a lot of work into this but there's still so much I can do.

There's always custom keycaps to feed your habit!

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Ultimate Mango posted:

The reactive or ripple effects when hitting a key is really really tempting. If it did that and felt like my Cherry Clears or ~*GASP*~ Heavier (clutch my pearls, I am veklempt over here) yeah okay I need new underpants now.

The CODE isn't perfect by any stretch and their shine through caps kind of suck, but it is such a joy to type on.

Custom shine through caps that were evenly lit and clear to read would be tempting.

Vortex makes great backlighting compatible keycaps

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


teethgrinder posted:

The Vortex caps are perfect for CODE. I found that more colourful backlighting-compatible caps on it looked weird with the luminous paint behind the caps.

Yeah, I've tried other backlighting compatible keycaps with my POK3R RGB and these are by far the best.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Ultimate Mango posted:

I knew I should have stayed out of this new thread. Instead I am about to buy two sets of these keycaps.

And I will love them.

This hobby is a gaping maw made of artisan keycaps.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


surebet posted:

stare into the abyss and remortgage your house



I'm the F key.

Artisan keycaps are the silliest poo poo.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


MrMoo posted:

So if Kalih is worse than meh, that doesn't suggest WhiteFox is going to be stellar if they rate it as a good alternative to their own new switches:

Yeah, this is why I decided not to contribute to the latest WhiteFox drop despite the fact I've wanted one forever.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


LionArcher posted:

Feeling better and better about having a cheap, well built CM storm board with real cherry blue switches, and getting a Race 3 for my birthday.

My first mechanical keyboard was actually a CM. Cherry MX Blues too.

You've got good taste.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Constellation I posted:

Word on the street is that new Kailh switches are pretty drat good now that they've stepped up their QC. Also, I'm typing on Outemu Blues right now and they feel just as good as Cherry Blues. (I think I actually prefer its click) My only gripe with them is that the stems are a little wobblier and it's noticeable on the non-stabilized mod keys.

If a few goons say as such I'll move them up to "meh".

e: I'm hard on the Otemus staying in nope because everything I've seen says their QC is abysmal. I'm sure your keys are fine, but they can't guarantee that kind of quality in every board with their switches.

The Unlife Aquatic fucked around with this message at 06:32 on Jul 6, 2017

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Horizontal Tree posted:

To install LED's later, all you'd have to do is remove the keycaps, unscrew the plate from the case and lift it out, then drop the LED's in and solder two pins on each. Repeat for each key, EZ.

This is my White Fox with DSA Granites next to the newish GPU I got, I found it funny that the GPU is isgnificantly larger


Good stuff, you want it in the OP?

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


I like how the enter key is moldy salmon pink.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Constellation I posted:



MaxKey SA Miami Night is taking group buys now at geekhack as well.

http://imgur.com/a/SIJk5

drat, these things are beautiful. Kind of want a set.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


VostokProgram posted:

Is there a basic, no-frills, tenkeyless mechanical keyboard that wouldn't look out of place in an office? I already have a CODE at home and I like it but I don't want to spend that much money on another one. Ideally something that won't sound annoying to my coworkers (but if it has to be loud they'd probably "get" it because they're also nerds)

A Ducky One is 90 bucks. Is that cheap enough?

The keycaps are a bit eh but they'd work until you decided you absolutely need some doubleshot PBT (a decent set is 30-40 bucks) keycaps.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Nondescript Van posted:

Keycap drop pushed back to end of October. Why do I even loving bother?

Oh right I'm dumb and I have a problem.

We all have a problem here, friend.

We can only use one keyboard at a time.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


I strongly approve of Cattes and Caps posting and think you made a great choice with your keycaps.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


ColHannibal posted:

Have you heard about our lord and savior Topre?

I would love to try Topre but they don't make 60% boards.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


The Electronaut posted:

Your Goldie locks between the HHKB and the Leopold FC660C :3

Thought about it, but those dye-sub keycaps and the difficulty of getting replacement Topre doubleshot PBT keycaps.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Speaking of 75% boards, does anyone here have a Vortex Race 3? I'm considering one myself since I want a new board.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


TenaciousTomato posted:

I bought that Nautilus key cap set. Someone pray for me

We need pictures when you get them. (In a year, or two)

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


colas posted:

I know some sites were linked but...what KB should I get just to see if I like it? I haven't used a MKB since I had an IBM in the 90s.

What's your budget?

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


SamDabbers posted:

The Cooler Master MasterKeys S seems like a solid TKL option. It's a refresh of the CM QuickFire Rapid with stock PBT keycaps, and is only $80.

I will vouch for CM's boards. My first mechanical keyboard was CM Quickfire with Blues and it was really great.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


I never thought I could hate anything more than artisanal keycaps yet here we are.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Because clearly keyboards are better when they stare at you with dead plastic eyes.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


FAT32 SHAMER posted:

Edit: welp guess I should have read the OP

Speaking of that, I was considering updating the recommended picks in the OP. Are there any boards people would suggest I put in there?

I want to make sure to have options to target people who want to spend a bit less on a board, but still make sure they get decent build quality. A few more towards the more typical 150 dollar price point is OK too.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


Ultimate Mango posted:

I think several of us have Code keyboards and like them.

I love mine with Clears. I wonder if Clears are just a gateway drug to cherry whites?

Already in the OP!

Honestly, I don't see why Clears are so popular. Blues and Greens are my favorite. I think my dream board right now might be a Vortex Race 3 with Greens.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


I suppose the fact I work from home means I'm biased.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


I also went ahead and hunted for the cheapest 100% boards I could find with decent quality. The KBTalking Next was the winner at 80 USD on mechanicalkeyboards.com. It has been added to the recs.

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


blugu64 posted:

I use a model m in the office

How often do you have to beat back angry coworkers with your keyboard?

The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


The WASD Keyboard is the most commonly recced board around here.

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The Unlife Aquatic
Jun 17, 2009

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It's the only way to live
In cars


a real chump posted:

i just got a vortex race 3 with cherry silvers (speed)

Any complaints? I've been thinking about buying one with Blues myself. I don't much mind the 1.5u esc/delete but I'm curious if there's anything else of note wrong with it.

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