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Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Wedge Antilles, Tycho Celchu, Hobbie Klivian and Wes Jason once got stranded on a planet of people who were obsessed with dueling using rapiers with blasters instead of a sharp tip.

It was inspired by The Three Musketeers, and the planet was called Adumar after Alexandre Dumas.

In a separate book, a group of Chiss (Thrawn's race) successfully managed to keep a bunch of hostile aliens in the dark as to what a Jedi can actually do by being assholes to Luke and Mara.

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Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Hazo posted:

Oh wow, is that what Starfighters of Adumar is about? That sounds kind of awesome.

Starfighters of Adumar is a legitimately fun space opera book that just happens to take place in the Star Wars universe, and has some really funny writing to boot. It's not going to go down in the pantheon of Great Sci-Fi Literature or anything but there are some really fun action sequences, they give a sort of less-advanced outsider's view of X-Wings and TIE Fighters and, as Zoran said, it has the best pun in the entire history of the franchise.

Gulping Again posted:

That's literally taken from Galaxy Express 999. Captain Harlock uses that exact weapon.

I've not seen that but does he still have to poke someone in order for the shooty part to work? Because the ones in Starfighters are literally described as "a gun that you have to stab someone with in order to shoot them", which is so stupid it wraps back around to awesome (and this is 100% deliberate on the author's part, based on the pilots' reactions to the things).

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Pennywise the Frown posted:

Why do writers feel the need to create new (and horrible) species? Like, there are already 1,000 different types. There is more than enough material to have 10+ different species in every book ever made.

This is just ridiculous.

There was a wolfman in A New Hope.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Vernii posted:

I think that might be the one where the Rebels and some frontier Imperial system team up to fight off an invasion by soul stealing dinosaurs.

One of the hardline imperials tries to kill Luke by putting parasite eggs in his food during some dinner.

Not just parasite eggs, but more or less xenomorph eggs. He had to use the Force to vomit them out instead of them coming out through his ribcage.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Up Circle posted:

Didn't luke fall in love with a lady in the battle of bakula book where the lizardmen human traffickers attack the planet bakula, and for absolutely zero reason the rebels go to save them?

And she ended up marrying the Imperial captain and died in a suicide attack against droid warships.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Argus Zant posted:


Anyway, here's an Old EU thing: at one point, the Old Republic decided it would be a good idea to build a fleet of like 200 warships, except that 199 of them were basically drones that would be controlled from the 1 crewed flagship. Except that right before the fleet was gonna be launched, the crew of the flagship either went insane or the ship's computer was infected by a computer virus and the whole fleet jumped into hyperspace on random coordinates, and nobody ever saw the fleet again. And it became a galaxy-wide urban legend about where the fleet- called the, no poo poo, Katana fleet- had ended up, or if it had even existed in the first place. Like, it was some straight-up RPG quest hook poo poo that your cousin/uncle/stoner friend knew a guy who knows a guy who knows a guy's cousin that has some vital and just-discovered clue about where the fabled Katana fleet might be.

And then Thrawn found it and threw it at the New Republic.

Well, actually, it was found by Jorj Cardas who told Talon Karrde and Thrawn managed to stumble onto it independently.

I think it went something like that.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm



quote:

Kam Nale, also known under the alias "Elan Mak," was a Fluggrian male professional Podracer pilot who flew an outdated Kurtob KRT 410-C around 32 BBY, during the final decades of the Galactic Republic. The son of the crime lord Borzu Nale, Nale received his inheritance early when the Glymphid hitman Aldar Beedo murdered his father. Nale sought to avenge his father's death and vowed to track down Beedo, following him to the Outer Rim world of Tatooine, where Nale discovered that Beedo had entered as a contestant in the upcoming Boonta Eve Classic Podrace. Nale began to use the pseudonym "Elan Mak" in order to join the race without raising suspicions, all the while hoping to be able to eliminate Beedo by shooting him during the race.

Legends was wild. I have zero memory of this character (which, trust me, is saying something) but he still has a full backstory involving murder and revenge.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Hazo posted:

Just going from memory here, but are those the Ssiii-roovi or whatever the hell from that Truce at Bakura novel?

I remember its big claim to fame was being the first EU story set after the movies, and just so nobody else could hold that title, the author started the book with Luke literally riding in a shuttle back from the Battle of Endor

Ssi-Ruuk, yeah.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Jazerus posted:

that's what that one human dude who's helping them hold down the imperial officer is for. he has known no life but servitude under the ssi-ruuk as "the vest guy"

IIRC, he's basically their Force-sensitive Judasgoat. He'd convince the humans everything was fine right up until their souls got ripped out of their bodies and stuffed into a fighter drone.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Did it even actually get a resolution? I remember she went undercover to try to stop Borsk from getting power and then next thing we know he's head of the New Republic.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


shame on an IGA posted:

That time the Hutts built a death star and the rebels hosed the pooch ten ways from sunday trying to stop them but it was okay because they used low-bid contractors for everything and cut the navigation system budget too close to the bone so it flew straight into an asteroid as soon as they tried to use it

Darksaber

Andersonnnnnn

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


karmicknight posted:

Gand Findsmen should have gotten the amount of deep loyalty that Mandolorians recieved

Bring back Ooryl!

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Defiance Industries posted:

It's amazing how he managed to come off as pretty likeable and interesting despite being paired with Stackpole's self-insert. I think he might genuinely be the best character Hackpole ever made.

I always liked the bit where Corran realized the blood-rimmed hole in the back of a Stormtrooper's helmet looked awfully like Ooryl's fist.

fartknocker posted:

Being paired with Corran meant he got among the most development of any character in those books, since Stackpole couldn’t ignore him like he tended to do with half the squadron.

I forget which of the various Star Wars threads I mentioned this in a while ago (The Squadrons one maybe?) but Stackpole’s X-wing books always have 3-4 Rogues who solely exist to be listed in the roster at the start, mentioned once or twice, and then die with minimal impact if any on the story. They might as well not even get names, just “Rogue 8” or whatever. Probably the best (Worst?) example of that is Gavin’s wingman, Riv Shiel, who across 4 books has like 3 total lines of dialogue and anything about his background is discussed in passing to talk other characters (Usually Corran). For someone around that long into the series, he basically isn’t developed at all.

The obvious contrast to this is the Wraith books, where all of them get at least a little fleshing out, actual lines of dialogue, and some bits of characterization. It makes them all far more memorable, even the ones who only last a portion of one book. It’s a shame Aaron Allston never got to do more with them.

What I think matters more is that the Rogues that die almost never affect the others. Riv Shiel, to use your example, gets blown out of space by Isard's pet Victory-class SD during an ambush (IIRC, anyway) and Gavin is never shown reacting to it. The next time we see him he's fled to an ice planet that Isard bombs off the map and that gets more of a reaction out of him than losing his wingmate of several years.

Meanwhile, every single dead Wraith has an effect on their comrades. Kel is distraught about not being able to save Jesmin, Falynn Sandskimmer dying does a serious number on Myn and Phanan's death wrecks everyone. I think Grinder's death has the least effect and that's mostly because he dies at the same time as Falynn and was explicitly a lot more of a hermit than everyone else.

Why the gently caress do I remember all of this.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


IIRC the space demon also ate Luke's ex from two of the worst books, Children of the Jedi and Planet of Twilight.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Defiance Industries posted:

*two of the worst books (non-Kevin J. Anderson division)

I am more than willing to put Planet of Twilight in with the KJA books.

None of them are Crystal Star, though.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Sodomy Hussein posted:

See here we make the classic mistake of ragging on something by making it sound 5,000 times cooler/funnier than it is

They manage to have all of that and be boring.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


karmicknight posted:

I forget what book it was in, maybe the bug trilogy or somewhere within the NJO series, but there is deffo an exchange between a surviving space nazi and like han solo, where the nazi opines "if only the empire had been around to stop the vong" and getting told "no, the empire was a bunch a stupid gently caress ups. they would have built a superweapon that then blew up and got themselves killed. idiots"

"That's not what The Empire would have done, Commander. What the Empire would have done was build a super-colossal Yuuzhan Vong-killing battle machine. They would have called it the Nova Colossus or the Galaxy Destructor or the Nostril of Palpatine or something equally grandiose. They would have spent billions of credits, employed thousands of contractors and subcontractors, and equipped it with the latest in death-dealing technology. And you know what would have happened? It wouldn't have worked. They'd forget to bolt down a metal plate over an access hatch leading to the main reactors, or some other mistake, and a hotshot enemy pilot would drop a bomb down there and blow the whole thing up. Now that's what the Empire would have done."

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm



She's not wrong.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Jazerus posted:



the problem with invoking interdictors as the explanation is that the imperial navy doesn't seem to use them in straight-up battles very often; in the EU, thrawn used them very effectively against the new republic precisely because it was a tactic that they hadn't had much experience fighting against. they were relegated to anti-piracy duty, which definitely has some overlap with anti-rebel duty in practice, but not enough to fully wave away the hyperdrive kamikaze tactic.

at a certain point you just have to reconcile yourself to the science fact that star wars makes no goddamn sense sometimes

Yeah, I think the EU eventually settled on Interdictors being more or less garbage in straight-up combat because of all the power the gravity well generators drew, which meant they could never be left alone if there was any chance they'd accidentally grab something with some teeth.

Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


Tatooine's been implied to be the human homeworld a few times, IIRC. And I feel like humanity having no known homeworld definitely came up in conversation in the EU at least once.

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Polaron
Oct 13, 2010

The Oncoming Storm


W.T. Fits posted:

You're assuming that the Empire told her what they were actually planning on calling these things and not just giving her a fake name like, "Asteroid Mining Station 001" or something bland and generic to keep her from realizing what she was really working on.

I'm pretty sure there's a scene in one of the X-Wing books where Rogue Squadron is undercover on Imperial Coruscant and watches a presentation of the Emperor's death that calls the Death Star some variation of "Imperial Planetary Ore Extractor"

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