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the book chooses the book-er
This poll is closed.
The Book of Five Rings by Miyamoto Musashi 6 23.08%
How To Read Donald Duck by Ariel Dorfman 8 30.77%
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick 4 15.38%
Manhattan Transfer by Jon Dos Passos 5 19.23%
John Hawkwood: An English Mercenary in Fourteenth-Century Italy by William Caferro 3 11.54%
Total: 26 votes
[Edit Poll (moderators only)]

 
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Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

Vote for your choice for next month's BOTM! You can vote for more than one!


The Book of Five Rings

quote:

The Book of Five Rings (五輪書, Go Rin no Sho) is a text on kenjutsu and the martial arts in general, written by the Japanese swordsman Miyamoto Musashi around 1643. There have been various translations made over the years, and it enjoys an audience considerably broader than only that of martial artists and people across East Asia: for instance, some foreign business leaders find its discussion of conflict and taking the advantage to be relevant to their work in a business context. The modern-day Hyōhō Niten Ichi-ryū employs it as a manual of technique and philosophy.

Musashi establishes a "no-nonsense" theme throughout the text. For instance, he repeatedly remarks that technical flourishes are excessive, and contrasts worrying about such things with the principle that all technique is simply a method of cutting down one's opponent. He also continually makes the point that the understandings expressed in the book are important for combat on any scale, whether a one-on-one duel or a massive battle. Descriptions of principles are often followed by admonitions to "investigate this thoroughly" through practice rather than trying to learn them by merely reading.


How To Read Donald Duck

quote:

How to Read Donald Duck (Spanish: Para leer al Pato Donald) is a 1971 book-length essay by Ariel Dorfman and Armand Mattelart that critiques Disney comics from a Marxist point of view as capitalist propaganda for American corporate and cultural imperialism.[1][2] It was first published in Chile in 1971, became a bestseller throughout Latin America[3] and is still considered a seminal work in cultural studies.[4] It was reissued in August 2018 to a general audience in the United States, with a new introduction by Dorfman, by OR Books.

The book's thesis is that Disney comics are not only a reflection of the prevailing ideology at the time (capitalism), but that they are also aware of this, and are active agents in spreading the ideology.




Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

quote:

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (retitled Blade Runner: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? in some later printings) is a science fiction novel by American writer Philip K. Dick, first published in 1968. The novel is set in a post-apocalyptic San Francisco, where Earth's life has been greatly damaged by a nuclear global war, leaving most animal species endangered or extinct. The main plot follows Rick Deckard, a bounty hunter who is tasked with "retiring" (i.e. killing) six escaped Nexus-6 model androids, while a secondary plot follows John Isidore, a man of sub-par IQ who aids the fugitive androids.

The book served as the primary basis for the 1982 film Blade Runner and many elements and themes from it were used in the film's 2017 sequel Blade Runner 2049.



Manhattan Transfer by Jon Dos Passos
(Newly out of copyright)

quote:

Manhattan Transfer is an American novel by John Dos Passos published in 1925. It focuses on the development of urban life in New York City from the Gilded Age to the Jazz Age as told through a series of overlapping individual stories.

It is considered to be one of Dos Passos' most important works. The book attacks the consumerism and social indifference of contemporary urban life, portraying a Manhattan that is merciless yet teeming with energy and restlessness. The book shows some of Dos Passos' experimental writing techniques and narrative collages that would become more pronounced in his U.S.A. trilogy and other later works. The technique in Manhattan Transfer was inspired in part by James Joyce's Ulysses (1922), T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, and bears frequent comparison to the experiments with film collage by Soviet director Sergei Eisenstein.

Sinclair Lewis described it as "a novel of the very first importance ... The dawn of a whole new school of writing." D. H. Lawrence called it "the best modern book about New York" he had ever read, describing it as "a very complete film ... of the vast loose gang of strivers and winners and losers which seems to be the very pep of New York." In a blurb for a European edition, Ernest Hemingway wrote that, alone among American writers, Dos Passos has "been able to show to Europeans the America they really find when they come here."[1]

John Hawkwood: An English Mercenary in Fourteenth-Century Italy by William Caferro

quote:

Sir John Hawkwood (c. 13231394) was an English soldier who served as a mercenary leader or condottiero in Italy. As his name was difficult to pronounce for non-English-speaking contemporaries, there are many variations of it in the historical record. He often referred to himself as "Haukevvod" and in Italy he was known as "Giovanni Acuto", meaning literally "John Sharp" (or "John the Astute") referring to his "cleverness or cunning".[1] His name was Latinised as Johannes Acutus ("John Sharp").[2] Other recorded forms are "Aucgunctur", "Haughd", "Hauvod", "Hankelvode", "Augudh", Auchevud", "Haukevvod", "Haukwode" and "Haucod".[3] His exploits made him a man shrouded in myth in both England and Italy. Much of his enduring fame results from the surviving large and prominent fresco portrait of him in the Duomo, Florence, made in 1436 by Paolo Uccello, seen every year by 4 1/2 million[4] tourists.

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Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

fake edit: i hosed up the poll and you can only vote for one

if you want to vote for more than one, post about it below

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

Voted Musashi, would also read that Manhattan Transfer thingy. I love Mariah Carey!

Gertrude Perkins
May 1, 2010

Gun Snake

dont talk to gun snake

Drops: human teeth


I voted for Donald Duck, also wanted to vote for PKD!

Mage_Boy
Dec 18, 2003

This hotdog is about as real as your story Steve Simmons



I've never participated before but I want to read more so I voted for PKD.

pleasecallmechrist
Sep 22, 2013

I lack the most basic processes inherent in all living organisms: reproducing and dying.

For some future BotM I would like to nominate anything by William Gay. The man can write and is quintessential Southern Gothic, which I don't recall us having read recently. I haven't read his short story collection 'I Hate To See That Evening Sun Go Down' but the title is absolutely reminiscent of Thomas Wolfe. His last pre mortem novel 'Twilight' is brilliant.

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

Mage_Boy posted:

I've never participated before but I want to read more so I voted for PKD.

I didn't vote for it because I've already read it a few times and my copy was lent out and never returned but sure, I'll support this goon's quest and find a copy somewhere.

This post is prime Mercerism

Jordan7hm
Feb 17, 2011

MENS REA? LOL MORE LIKE CHRIS REA AM I RITE





Lipstick Apathy

Voted for the Duck book because that seems pretty wild. Hopefully not 5 ring because I read that a decade ago and got rid of my copy at some point.

Glimpse
Jun 5, 2011



Voted Duck, but I'd be happy with any of these. The Hawkwood bio sounds interesting because I've recently been playing Crusader Kings 3 but a quick google suggests it's not easy to get, or at least not cheap. I've read Sheep before and might still have a paper copy around someplace.

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

ok, it'll be duckbook

I'll also recommend additional duck related books and some counter-duck arguments as well

specifcally, it might be adviseable for people to pick up The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck

Hieronymous Alloy fucked around with this message at 18:38 on Feb 1, 2021

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ovenboy
Nov 16, 2014



I might not be able to participate, like usual, but I tend to get around to the books eventually (I am looking forward to ignition!)
I just wanted to thank the poster that suggested Lonesome Dove in a previous thread. I am mostly through it and it is delightful, and gruesome! I hadn't heard of it before but feel much richer now.

Scrooge McDuck is cool too, I used to hunt for Don Rosa stories in flea markets as a kid.

ovenboy fucked around with this message at 09:10 on Feb 2, 2021

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