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The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Pram posted:

I'm planning on wiring my place with ethernet, what face plates do you guys use?

I just did this last year and here is what I did:

Patch panel and cat6 from Monoprice.

Leviton Decora inserts and wallplates. Personally I like these because, like electrical outlets and switches, you can remove the surrounding plate for painting without pulling out the whole bundle of wires and connectors.

Leviton quickport connectors (I used the eXtreme 6+ QuickPort jacks for ethernet). Personally I found that tselectronic.com had the best prices on Leviton stuff either online or locally, especially once you get into the 10+ unit discounts. Graybar also carries the good stuff if you have a location local to you, but their prices are slightly higher and their selection tends to be a little more restrictive.

Everything runs through an HP Procurve switch (I went with the 16 port v1410). They are fanless, perform flawlessly, were a little cheaper than the Cisco models and, unlike the Cisco, the reviews weren't filled with reports of them dying after one year.

I had an old Zyxel 2X router but I recently ditched it for a Mikrotik 750GL since the Zyxel was hitting it's limits and throttling my connection. Mikrotik routers are fantastic although you need to have some idea of what you are doing before you dive into them. CuddleChunks' Mikrotik thread has a lot of good info and a basic setup guide if you are interested. You can't beat sub-$100 hardware that gives you enterprise level configuration options.

In general I ran 3 cat6 lines to each room (2 ethernet and 1 voice) except behind the media center where I put 4 ethernet jacks for the HTPC and consoles. I also ran 1x RG6 to each room (Belden tri-shield cable and Holland connectors and splitters).

I got a small 4u wall mount rack and mounted the patch panel and switch in the top two spaces along with a small cantilever shelf on the bottom to hold the router and cable modem. This was all mounted to a board on the the basement wall along with a Leviton 110 punchdown block for the phones and the splitters for the cable. The whole thing is fairly modular and makes it very easy to switch between any combination of TV, phone and internet providers by just switching a few plugs around.

The_Franz fucked around with this message at 19:02 on Oct 12, 2011

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The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

movax posted:

Huh, how are those different from the "Regular" Leviton modular connectors, or have they just always been called QuickPort?

They use the term QuickPort for all of their modular stuff.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

American Jello posted:

If mikrotik could make a functional web gui and a 'quick set up' type feature (dhcp client/server/nat/wifi already set up out of the box), I think they would blow all the other consumer stuff out of the water.

Web configuration (Webfig) on the current RouterOS versions works just fine.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

CuddleChunks posted:

The RB750G is the one I'd recommend though.

The 750G is discontinued. It was replaced with the 750GL which has twice the RAM but a slower CPU. It should still be more than adequate unless your WAN connection exceeds 100mbps.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

lonters run around posted:

What's a nice non-wireless router capable of running DD-WRT that would work for a small company, with like under 10 people using it simultanously? All the ones listed in the OP are wireless. I'm asking because I suppose with a non-wireless one we would get a better router for a lower price.

Something like the Mikrotik 750GL is dirt cheap and will do everything that you want. For a cheaper option there is also the regular 750 if you don't need the gigabit switch ports. They won't run DD-WRT, but RouterOS is rock-solid stable and can be configured to do just about anything you want.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Devian666 posted:

On a side note that highest performing domestic router listed in the op can achieve about 800 mbit/s WAN to LAN throughput which is below what you have requested.

Just a note about the smallnetbuilder.com figures: if you read their testing methods for LAN-WAN throughput they put the LAN system in the DMZ which means that their throughput tests don't reflect real world usage in a typical setup (no NAT, no firewall, etc...). In fact, I'd wager that some of those home gigabit routers that they have tested to "route" at near wire speed are just doing switching in that configuration.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Triikan posted:

Probably a Mikrotik or the like would be good for this.
A goon is selling a higher end one here:
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3446462
They sell other versions in various price ranges.

The newer RB1100AH should do the trick as well. I think that within a month or two Mikrotik is also launching the RB1100AHx2 which is basically the RB1100AH with a dual-core CPU.

Since VPN was mentioned it also worth noting the the RB1000 and RB1100AH have hardware accelerated encryption. Some of Mikrotik's benchmarks showed that these things can still manage 500mbps+ when running encrypted VPN connections.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

CuddleChunks posted:

This should do the trick: http://www.roc-noc.com/mikrotik/rou...rd/rb750gl.html

http://www.ilsistemista.net/index.p...ew.html?start=2

The 750GL is a great unit, but there is no way you are going to actually do routing/firewall/NAT on a full gigabit connection with it.

Ninja Rope posted:

That does appear to be fast enough, but I doubt it does NAT in hardware so it's hard to estimate exactly what performance impact it would have. Something from Cisco or Juniper would run $750-$1000 if you bought it new.

Not really related, but I wonder how that differs from a standard PC in this instance. If NAT isn't done in hardware, you're limited by the CPU speed for NAT performance. In that case why not use a standard PC (form factor? power usage? price?)?

If you look at bottom of the spec page there is a row in the table with firewall: on and conntrack: on (conntrack is connection tracking for NAT). It can do near gigbit speeds with 512 byte frames and 2.5 gigabits with 1518 byte frames with routing, NAT and firewall capabilities turned on.

The_Franz fucked around with this message at 16:12 on Nov 16, 2011

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

NOTinuyasha posted:

It probably hurts that the CPU power has been reduced, the 750G was 680MHz, the GL is 400. I don't think the price has gone down either.

They weakened the CPU but doubled the RAM, probably to further differentiate it from the 450G. Still, for most cable and DSL connections it has more than enough power for normal use.

The_Franz fucked around with this message at 07:59 on Nov 16, 2011

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

NOTinuyasha posted:

CPU power can be a bottleneck even on residential connections if you use it as a VPN server/client or something. I don't know how RAM effects it, but 32MB wasn't a problem on the old model, at least with the current firmware.

I think the extra RAM was put there to use with metarouter.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Thoom posted:

Just wanted to give a quick update on this. I'm up and running. The RB1000 can't quite handle a gigabit -- it hits 100% CPU around 750Mbits, but that's probably close enough seeing that nothing out there will actually push a Gbit to me for the foreseeable future. I do find it kind of puzzling that it can't handle the speed as well as the Cisco TES-301 that Google provisioned me, but at least it won't crash all the god drat time.

Your results are pretty close to what the official performance numbers are when using 512 byte packets.

The TES-301 looks like it's just a home gateway that offers NAT and nothing else. It's fast because it's probably just doing hardware NAT and doesn't have a firewall, queuing, SPI or other features that require every packet to be inspected and passed through a processing chain.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Wheelchair Stunts posted:

Why don't they do encryption in hardware? Such cards have existed for at least 20 years to the best of my knowledge?

High speed VPN performance isn't really something that a lot of SOHO users need so the extra cost of adding encryption hardware would go to waste most of the time.

That said, even those encryption acceleration cards that work with m0n0wall or pfsense are only good for about 40-50Mbps of traffic. For 75Mbps of encrypted traffic you need something like a higher end Routerboard (RB1100AH or better), a Sonicwall device or a full-blown PC. The Mikrotik and Sonicwall solutions will run around $400+. You could cobble together a PC for less, but chances are that the savings will be gradually eaten up by an increased electric bill

The_Franz fucked around with this message at 21:22 on Dec 27, 2011

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Ninja Rope posted:

What cards are these? Modern CPUs have AES instructions built in which give huge performance speedups and you can get Cavium cards as fast/expensive as you could possibly want.

I should have clarified that I was thinking of those Soekris and Alix appliances with an encryption card added in. Even with a supported encryption card the benchmarks I've seen for VPN traffic are typically only around 40-50Mb since they just don't have the raw power to do more.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

XboxPants posted:

So we're planning on getting a newer better router, and the main thing I want is range since we have a 3-story house, with the router at the bottom floor.. I guess I just need to buy repeaters but I was looking at the stuff in the OP: http://www.ubnt.com/nanostationloco

Am I reading that right, that thing has a 10 kilometer range? Yeah I think I'm looking at something above what I need. Is there a good router with really great range that I should consider, or should I just use repeaters? That Airport Extreme 5e says it has "incredible" range; is that BS marketing or is it really a step above? I'd be extremely willing to pay extra for a long-range router instead of buying multiple pieces of hardware and setting up a big network.

It has a 10km range because it has a high-gain directional antenna for doing point-to-point setups. Move away from the area immediately in front of it and your reception will very quickly drop off. If you want a powerful AP for home use look at something like the Picostation which comes with an omnidirectional antenna or perhaps a setup with a few UniFi units if you have a really big house.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

alanthecat posted:

What should I be buying if I want an external antenna and dd-wrt? I need to build a bridge between two buildings so I can run backups at night. There's 75m between the two buildings. Router will have to go inside the window and the antenna outside. I'm hoping a pair of these will do:



Any particular reason why you can't use something purpose built for point-to-point links like a pair of Ubiquiti Nanostations or Mikrotik SXTs? You will get a faster and more reliable connection compared to some jury-rigged solution using hacked consumer routers and aftermarket antennas.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Space Cadet posted:

I have always been told that 100' is where a slight drop is, I have multiple 50' runs in my condo with 0 issues.

I think the general rule is 100 meters, not feet.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

ashgromnies posted:

What's the RB750 get you for routing versus just using the switch built into the Asus?

Ironically I work at a networking company. Everything we make is in the thousands of dollars at the extreme low end though, I have no idea about consumer stuff

They can do almost everything the multi-thousand dollar stuff does. IPSEC, VPNs, routing protocols, all manner of tunnels, complex firewall rules, IPv6 support, QoS, etc... They have demo units on the website that you can poke around if you want to check it out for yourself.

Even if you don't need all of this stuff they are still stable set-and-forget systems. People do use this stuff to run larger scale networks and WISPs.

The_Franz fucked around with this message at 19:26 on Oct 26, 2012

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Inspector_71 posted:

Also, something that gets overlooked a lot: consider putting your demarc on the first floor, centrally located. So many people put it in some dank corner of the basement and it means the router that goes there will probably be worthless, wireless-wise. If you do the drops correctly, setting up APs will be trivial, but you might as well get some extra use out of the (hopefully) kickass router you buy to run the whole thing.

Better yet, put in some ceiling drops and install a few ceiling mounted APs like the UniFi units. It will give far better coverage than a router stuffed in a closet or surrounded by a metal rack, particularly if you want to use 5Ghz.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

revmoo posted:

I'm pretty torn between getting something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...d=AIQCJCU6OX783

And something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=A2IX3RNQE846HA

Take a look at this HP Procurve switch as well. It has a great warranty, it's fanless and it's cheaper than the Cisco to boot.

The_Franz fucked around with this message at 01:23 on Nov 9, 2012

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Also, the 802.11ac "standard" still isn't standardized, so there is always the chance that draft and final gear won't play nicely together. Some people that bought draft-n gear got burned because it didn't work with gear built to the final standard.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

IOwnCalculus posted:

So, assuming I can't resurrect the WRT320N, I'll be shopping for something to replace it with. I've had it in my head that it should be gigabit because I don't like the idea of a '300Mbps' wireless connection being choked down to a 100Mbps link to the rest of my network. However, as I think about this right now, I think I'm being overly paranoid on that - correct? Any particular recommendations anyone has for something cheap, ideally with concurrent dual-band?

Even if you are running one device right next to it on a 40Mhz channel and a clean signal environment, the real-world performance of a 300Mbps wireless router will still top out under 100Mbps.

Don't worry about gigabit until you hit the 3x3 MIMO models which can actually go a bit over 100Mbps with perfect conditions.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Lowen SoDium posted:

I don't have an outrageous internet connection yet. Currently it's just 30/3 with an option to get to 50/5. But my contacts at the cable company say that >100Mbps is likely before the end of the year. Also, there is a good chance that the local utility company is going to offer fiber internet in the next couple of years.

Also, it looks like the RB750G has been discontinued for the RB750GL which has more memory but a slower CPU. Because of this, I have also been looking at the RB450G which is about the same cost of the RB2011-UAS-RM. I realize that either of those routers are probably over kill for what I am doing currently, I just would rather buy an over sized router that will have enough capacity to last a while.

The RB2011 will easily handle roughly 250-300Mbps of total traffic with a typical set of firewall rules and some basic queuing. If you are facing the prospect of fiber and want something that could do firewall and routing duties for potential gigabit service, then you might want to just cough up the cash for something like the RB1100AHx2 or maybe even a Cloud Core Router.

The_Franz fucked around with this message at 16:34 on Jan 4, 2013

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Devian666 posted:

It don't really get this. Why would you want to ban towns from building their own network infrastructure. It's like someone hates competition and the free market (has been bribed by a large ISP).

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...-5mbps-service/

Whereas in NZ the Government is funding 150 mbit/s uncontested fibre to the entire country.

You answered your own question. If you are a phone or cable company and you can charge $60 a month for something like 10/1 service or lower because you are the only game in town, of course you don't want those uppity citizens voting to build their own fiber network where the lowest speed tier is far above your highest one. It comes down to what is cheaper; kicking a few grand into some reelection campaigns or upgrading your infrastructure.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

zer0spunk posted:

I'm thinking about jumping from a 25/3 service to 50/5. Right now my network consists of a wifi printer (/g), my PC which is hardwired to the router (router, pc, and coax drop are all next to each other thankfully), and then a room mates imac (/g).

The 2008 imac is /n capable. The PC has no wifi card or need for one, so that'll stay hard wired. The printer can only do /g.

Will I have any issues staying with my WRT54g? My biggest concern is if the g router hard wired will have any issues using the increased bandwidth. I know if I bump up to an N router then I'll still need to run in a mixed mode to support the printer's /g..which means I'd end up buying an N router and a longer USB cable to hard wire the printer and stay in /n only.

I'd rather not have to buy a new router though.

I'm surprised that you haven't noticed issues already. When dealing with WAN<->LAN the plain old WRT54G can generally only handle about 20Mbps of traffic before the CPU is maxed out. Also bear in mind that the 54Mbps wireless speed is combined up/down throughput so you are only getting 27Mbps in either direction.

So, yes, it will be a bottleneck.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Three-Phase posted:

Yeah, if I wanted free internet or someone else to blame for illegal crap, I'd probably tap one of the dozens of other connections. Some are probably still running WEP.

My understanding is that if you're a script kiddie or just someone wanting to bum wireless, when you see WPA2 or even just WPA it's basically "forget it". And besides WPS pin attacks, there aren't any really exploits against WPA2 like there are for WEP.

I was going to originally say there "weren't any good exploits", but it seems like besides WPS pin attacks, or someone using a stupidly weak password and brute forcing that, there aren't any known exploits for WPA/WPA2 period.

WPA with TKIP is considered broken as well. Using WPA/WPA2 with AES is still hardened against anything but weak passwords.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

Jimmmmah posted:

Thanks for the help, I was going to get a 350m bulk cable and wire it properly with panels and faceplates to tidy it all up. I think cat6 may be overkill and rather save some money on getting the cat5e shielded then, I just need to find somewhere cheap in the UK then !

You don't need shielded cable unless you have a reason for it, and I'm guessing that you don't have generators or industrial equipment humming away in your home generating a lot of electromagnetic interference. Shielded CAT5 generally costs more than unshielded CAT6 and when you run shielded cable you need shielded outlets, patch panels and patch cords as well, which are considerably more expensive than standard ones. The only real issue you might hit with CAT6 in a home installation is with sharp bends, and even then it has to be pretty sharp to cause a problem. Most of the other issues are generally associated with running it in large buildings where you have rows of fluorescent lights or are stacking hundreds of cables on top of each other in a conduit or cable rack. Regular CAT6 is rated for 10G use as long as the runs are generally under 55m, which most runs in a home installation should be well under unless you live in a castle.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

LCD Deathpanel posted:

I was considering getting a static IP (Comcast business line), but they haven't once changed my 'dynamic' IP address at all in ~1.5 years of service. Not sure if it's the same way with a residential line or how other providers handle it.

In the 10 years I've had cable internet, my IP has changed exactly twice: once when the area changed from Comcast to Time Warner and once since then when they changed the whole area to a different class A subnet for some reason.

My brother is on RCN in the Boston area and has had the same IP since he moved there a year ago.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

SamDabbers posted:

Yeah, that is a bummer. I'm guessing that they haven't ported the controller software to the EdgeRouter because it uses a MongoDB database and it'd use up a ton of RAM and thrash the flash storage on the router. Lots of people have requested that they make a version to run on the EdgeRouter though.

That, and the controller software itself is written in Java which doesn't help the situation on embedded devices.

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The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

crm posted:

The EdgeRouter POE will power the UniFi APs, right?

Also, anybody know if the mounting brackets are interchangable? Like if I get the standard UAP, I can replace them with the UAP-AC later?

The bracket for the older units is round and the AC is rectangular, so no.

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