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Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Pudgygiant posted:

There's going to be a dedicated Cisco wireless cert before the end of the decade, I'd bet a paycheck on it.

Like a CCIE Wireless?

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Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Inspector_71: The following is going in way too much detail if you are studying for your CCNA, so don't try to learn this by heart. If you are working towards SWITCH, try a few combinations of bpduguard, bpdufilter (on interface and global) and portfast, so you can see the differences in behavior.

psydude posted:

If I'm not mistaken, filter and guard do the same thing, but one shuts down the port completely while the other brings it out of port fast.

Guard puts a port in Err-Disable when a BPDU is recieved. Filter on an interface drops bpdu's. Filter in this case trumps guard, so it will never go into err-disable. A globally set BPDUfilter will drop an interface out of portfast-mode. Since global filter only works on ports with portfast. A port recieving a BPDU is no longer in portfastand consequently no longer in the global bpdufilter.

From IP Expert:

IP Expert Blog posted:

Per documentation, global BPDU Filter is configured as part of global “portfast” configuration. The purpose of BPDU Filter is to prevent the switch from sending BPDU frames on ports that are enabled with portfast.

With the global filter, a few BPDU's are sent, "just in case" and it will drop the port out of portfast if a BPDU is recieved. With the filter set on the interface, it will not send any BPDU's and it will drop any BPDU's it recieves.

Or, let's let Cisco explain:

Catalyst 3560 Configuration Guide posted:

The BPDU filtering feature can be globally enabled on the switch or can be enabled per interface, but the feature operates with some differences.

At the global level, you can enable BPDU filtering on Port Fast-enabled interfaces by using the spanning-tree portfast bpdufilter default global configuration command. This command prevents interfaces that are in a Port Fast-operational state from sending or receiving BPDUs. The interfaces still send a few BPDUs at link-up before the switch begins to filter outbound BPDUs. You should globally enable BPDU filtering on a switch so that hosts connected to these interfaces do not receive BPDUs. If a BPDU is received on a Port Fast-enabled interface, the interface loses its Port Fast-operational status, and BPDU filtering is disabled.

At the interface level, you can enable BPDU filtering on any interface by using the spanning-tree bpdufilter enable interface configuration command without also enabling the Port Fast feature. This command prevents the interface from sending or receiving BPDUs.

Jelmylicious fucked around with this message at 14:01 on Dec 14, 2012

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Pudgygiant posted:

How ballsy would it be to schedule 640-802 one day and SWITCH, ROUTE, and TSHOOT the next? I'm confident I can sit the CCNA and destroy it but I need some motivation to push through what I'm weak on for the CCNP.

edit
Goddammit I literally put down my SWITCH book to post that, I'm so bad at studying

Depends on your mindset and skill level. If you really think you can do it, go for it. Chances are real you will not make it, though. But hey, in that case, you've had a practice run of the exam and know where your weak points are. You might even get one or two exams out of the way. Ask yourself: will you miss the money for the exams? Do you know ROUTE so well, you'd only need to study for SWITCH? Can you concentrate long enough to do three exams in a row? If you fail the first, will you be too distracted to sit the next one?
It is a really ballsy move, but -if it gets you off your rear end and if you won't miss the exam money- it might be fun. By the way, TSHOOT is actually fun to sit! I enjoyed it a lot.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

psydude posted:

Thanks. That's good to hear; I didn't think the lab material was particularly difficult and I barely touch any layer 3 stuff aside from static routes and the occasional ACL/NAT.

Just make sure you know most of what is on the relevent ones of these: http://packetlife.net/library/cheat-sheets/

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

DropsySufferer posted:

Lammle's Book is really not helping me learn subnetting can anyone recommend something better?

The only real way to learn is to practice till it clicks. For that you can use https://www.subnettingquestions.com
Just keep hitting those questions until you start seeing patterns and are confident in it.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

psydude posted:

So go forth and enjoy your 192.168.5.0/23 address scope.

Don't you mean 192.168.4.0/23 address scope? 192.168.5.0/23 is just an ip address.

doomisland posted:

The best waste is a /64 for a point to point link instead of a /127
A lot of the time, you just have to route over a link, not to a link. So why waste any addresses at all, just use link local. Most IGP's default to using link local as next hop anyway.

Jelmylicious fucked around with this message at 12:36 on Jan 24, 2013

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

hooah posted:

I've started the portion of the Lammle book on subnetting (Class B, specifically), and am somewhat confused on his implementation of the method for finding how many subnets you have. Up to /24, he was subtracting the 3rd octet from 256, which made sense because the 4th was still 0. But when he got to /25, he subtracted the 3rd, and moved to the 4th octet at /26. Why is the divide /25 to /26, rather than /24 to /25?

Sounds like a misprint. Basically, you subtract the octet that is not 255 or 0, and work with that. Have you downloaded the errata?

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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hooah posted:

Where is the errata? The only download I saw on the website is the zip with the study program.

I basically assumed* that there would be errata, because any technical book needs them. No author or editor is infallible. It might say something about errata in the introduction of your book. I couldn't find any for you either.

*<insert standard remark about assumptions>

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

The jncia is the ccent or ccna of juniper, and yes: it truely was that easy. I should hope that the harder ones are actually harder.
If I recall correctly, the exams used to be both pearson vue and prometric. They just dropped the one. The exams should stil feel the same.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Don't forget that you can only use :: once in an address.

2001:0000:0000:b00b:0000:0000:0000:0a55 should be shortened to 2001:0:0:b00b::a55. If you would do 2001::b00b::a55, it could also mean (for instance) 2001:0:0:0:0:0b00b:0:a55. Rule is: do it once, do the longest consecutive 0's as ::, and use :0: for the others. If there is a tie in 0-length, than I believe you should do the first string.

Recreating an address is easy. You know the length of every IPv6 address: 128 bits, or 8 "octets" (should that be hexidecitets?). So, ::1 will expand to 8 octets long, 0's are only abbreviated from the start of an octet. Let's start with making 8 octets: 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1. Now, lets perpend the 0's to make each octet 4 digits wide: 0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001

e:

1000101 posted:

FEDC:0000:0000:0000:00CF:0000:BA98:1234

Can be represented all of these ways:
FEDC::00CF:0000:BA98:1234
FEDC::CF:0:BA98:1234
FEDC:0:0:0:CF::BA98:1234
FEDC:0:0:0:CF:0:BA98:1234
Except that only a few are according to the conventions, so you should only use:
FEDC:0000:0000:0000:00CF:0000:BA98:1234 or FEDC::CF:0:BA98:1234
If you abbreviate, abbreviate fully, or don't do it at all. Otherwise you will just cause confusion. The other versions are just intermediate steps for abbreviations.

Jelmylicious fucked around with this message at 08:02 on Feb 7, 2013

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Zaii posted:

A) Take the upgrade to turn my 680/685 into the Windows 8 equivalent. Will extend the life of my certs from retirement, with just one exam. Will potentially demonstrate that I'm knowledgeable on portable / tablet platforms?

B) Head straight into the Windows Server 2012 certs. This will happen regardless, as I want to secure an MCSE (or whatever the hell MS are calling it nowadays)

C) Tie up loose ends first. Subnetting is still a black subject for me. While I now understand their purpose, CIDR and VLSM still don't quite sit right in my mind. I'd like to refresh on the more recent N+ syllabus, without actually taking the exam. I'd also like to look into PowerShell in greater depth, as it looks pretty interesting.

Don't go for A. Since you have a job with downtime right now, I would start at C. Practice your subnetting and try to automate anything you can think of with powershell. Go to https://www.subnettingquestions.com for a few minutes a day, until you start seeing the patterns. Go to the powershell thread here and start reading and asking questions. Once you start to become comfortable with those, work towards your MCSE. There will be some powershell and subnetting questions on those exams, and they will have become easier. Meanwhile, knowing powershell and subnetting will make you better at your job.

The more you automate, the more time you have to learn.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

MC Fruit Stripe posted:

e: Oh, you're into EIGRP? Yeah that was pretty cool before it went all mainstream.

Nah, man. I am so next gen, I run RIPng. Nothing goes better with IPv6 than trusty old RIP! (I once had an admin tell me he ran IPv7 on his backend. All I could think of was: wow, that's even older then IPv6 and actually deprecated.. (actually, I just thought: idiot).

To the guy wanting to get into security and also fancies linux, you could look into an entry level linux cert, like LPI. But the best course is probably to start sec+ to get your feet wet and to also see wich part of security interests you the most. Or just go for what you will be working with, so you can practice on the job.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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With TSHOOT, as long as you don't answer the question, you can back out and go for a different ticket.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Corvettefisher posted:

[...]After which it is straight to VMware/storage/network.[..]

So, I am looking into CCNA-Datacenter, or RHCSA.

I like the objectives of the CCNA-Datacenter and think I could learn some best practice networking skills, however the RHCSA, while they don't have many unix customers in need of support they are growing, I feel it would be more fun and teach me a lot more.

Suggestions?

As a networker, I would say: go for that CCNA-DC. The workings of the network (storage or data) is integral to the working of your virtual environment. It will help you diagnose problems faster and help you speak the lingo with your networking team.

Since you seem to be compiling a list, how about some storage certs?

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Powdered Toast Man posted:

Regarding the Juniper stuff, I found this, which is free: http://www.juniper.net/us/en/traini..._studyguide.pdf

...although a dead tree version would be preferable. What can I say? I like having a book open on my desk murdering trees.

I don't suppose anyone ITT has done Juniper training? I'm not really a fan of sims and I'm not sure what hardware might be worth getting.

That study guide is for an old version of the JNCIA exam, which was a lot harder than JNCIA-junos is now. There are two PDFs on the Juniper site, around 75-100 pages each*. Those cover the current version of the exam. If you already have CCNA or better, it is basically learning the syntax and the way Juniper approaches stuff. If you are comfortable on that level, it should only take you two days of reading. No practice gear needed.
There is a readiness assessment exam on the juniper website, to check how you are doing. Also, check out the Junos as a second language course: https://learningportal.juniper.net/...fo.aspx?id=3310

*I just checked, and can't find these PDFs anymore. Sent you a PM for help.

Jelmylicious fucked around with this message at 14:11 on May 27, 2013

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Powdered Toast Man posted:

Isn't JunOS syntax rather similar to IOS anyway, with show commands and whatnot?

There are quite a few distinct differences, which make it feel different. It reminds me more of IOS-XR.
First off, commands only take effect after you commit them, making it possible to put in a whole bunch of commands without worrying about a correct order.
It is also very hierarchical, and who you do your configuration, it is indented with parentheses, just like well programmed code. Any setting you make, will be made by a command starting with set. You can migrate all settings off an interface by renaming the interface. When you are in configuration mode, and you are under Gi1/1, if you do a show, you will see the current configuration of the interface.

So in short, enough differences to make it feel totally different. Almost like saying linux and windows command shell are the same because you navigate both with cd.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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psydude posted:

Odom has made studying for ROUTE 10 times more painful than it should have been. But if I pass it this Saturday I'll be done with him.

Good luck!

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

psydude posted:

So I'm taking ROUTE on Saturday. Any major areas I should focus on for last minute studying? I know there's a ton of sims.

Go here, and review all the defaults and how they differ per protocol: http://packetlife.net/library/cheat-sheets/
The sims you can do when you know how everything is supposed to work. Questions about default AD, you either know or you don't.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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Cenodoxus posted:

Some enterprising goon could make a fortune writing a test engine that randomly generates the numbers and corresponding answers - or maybe someone already has and I just haven't heard of it. That would have been enough to keep me on my toes past the eighth or ninth practice round.

Well, for subnetting, there is https://www.subnettingquestions.com

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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Protokoll posted:

I was presented with an awesome opportunity today! I work for a telco and I was told that I may be brought into the fold on a ground-floor SP MPLS network that we're designing. At worst, I'll be primarily responsible for the internal network while our current top guru gets pulled onto that project. Either way, it's a HUGE opportunity for me (not many people get to see an ISP built from day one).

Needless to say, I need to learn a whole lot of information. I don't want to just get a piece of paper, I need to actually know the material because the people I work with are smart and they will call me on my bullshit without hesitation. Luckily, I have an engineering background, so networking just clicks for me. I sat down with our top guy for a few days, read Odom's books over the long weekend and crushed the new CCNA today.

I took a cursory glance at CCNP ROUTE and the material doesn't look horrific. If my eventual goal is actual, comprehensive CCIE R&S/SP knowledge in an accelerated time frame -- is my next move CCNP R&S or CCNA SP? I want to have a better understanding of BGP as soon as possible since a huge part of this potential opportunity is going to involve serious poo poo w/r/t BGP. Just looking for some advice from Cisco guys; I'm young, ambitious and my company is behind me one-hundred percent.

Classes I should take? Unrelated books to read? Best next body of knowledge to tackle?

Since you need to learn BGP well, and you are not primarily concerned about getting a piece of paper as quickly as possible, I would start with ROUTE and then SPADVROUTE. You are allowed to take the exams without having the requisites for the certification.
I finished my CCNP R&S and am now going for CCNP SP. Having CCNP let's me sub CCNA:SP plus SPROUTE. (downside of that is that I am skipping IS-IS, but my company doesn't use that right now.)

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Gap In The Tooth posted:

Skip N+ and go straight into either CCENT as Tasty Wheat says or if you are brave go for the straight CCNA.

Agreed, go straight for CCENT, which will bring you halfway up to CCNA. Cisco is way more prevalent than juniper, but once you have your CCNA, a JNCIA is quite easy to get. There is a lot of overlap and it is never bad to have seen a different way of doing things.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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VR Cowboy posted:

Can anyone recommend a good textbook or study material for JNCIA-Junos JN0-101? A lot of prep guides I've seen on Amazon were published almost 10 years ago.

The current JNCIA-Junos PDFs are a bit hard to find. They made the jncia WAY easier a bit back, so the 500 page books are too much information. You should look for the 2 part PDF that are titled JNCIA-Junos Study Guide—Part 1 and 2. I also recommend the "Junos as a second language" if you are not very familiar with juniper yet.

e: pm'd you a download link, since they seem to be hard to locate on the juniper site.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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Tab8715 posted:

I'd assume the JNCIA is the exact same thing as the CCNA. I wonder what the actual differences are aside from command-line syntax.

JNCIA doesn't have any switching in it and is slightly easier than the CCNA.The juniper track its less well known to HR, but it's still a good program that can go quite deep.
Maybe suggest a ccna as basis, then do the juniper certs in the specialisation and up to the level that you want.
The reason I suggest it, is because the ccna is a good basis and there is good overlap with JNCIA. And it never hurts to see two different sides to the story.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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skipdogg posted:

I'm ashamed of my certifications

Welcome to certifiers anonymous

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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Comradephate posted:

It doesn't, but I think it's fair to say that the way Cisco does things is well known.

Except that Cisco isn't even consistent with itself. Just compare IOS with IOS XR, ASA or NXOS. Show interface ip brief vs. Show ip interface brief?
Or within IOS itself:
Ip hello-interval eigrp and ip ospf hello-interval.
I know some of these are for legacy reasons, but I much prefer the hierarchical CLI of junos or ios xr. The added length of the commands are a small price to pay. And I love that junos uses parentheses.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

If you are more comfortable with decimal and just want to compute the range, just view the network address as the lower boundary and add the wildcard mask as the higher. Please note that this only works for masks with contiguous zeros and ones. So:
192.168.0.0 0.0.0.15 matches 192.168.0.0 through 192.168.0.15 including.
10.4.0.0 0.3.255.255 matchs 10.4.0.0 through 10.7.255.255 including.
If you would make a bitmask that isn't all zeros followed by all ones, you will have to use binary.

NB if you already use decimal to calculate subnet ranges, this is the same, except you already did the setup off calculating 255.255.255.255 - <netmask>

Edit to explain a non-contiguous mask: This is not something you would use often or makes your configuration understandable, but could make the math clear. And it is very useful to troubleshoot a mistake:
Let's say you want all even IP addresses in 192.168.10.0/24 to match. The octets of interest are 192.168.10 and then we are also interested in the last bit of the last octet being a 0. So, to match the first three octets, it is all zeroes. To match the last bit of the last octet, we need all ones, and a zero at the end: 11111110, shiwch is 254.
So, the subnet + wildcard of 192.168.10.0 0.0.0.254 matches all even addresses in 192.168.10.0. If you put 192.168.10.1 0.0.0.254, it would be all uneven addresses.

Jelmylicious fucked around with this message at 08:21 on Sep 30, 2013

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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CrazyLittle posted:

I would agree with you, but I've seen way too many systems guys who think everything past the NIC is magic.

It is not magic, you just plug the cable in and it works! What's so hard about making two computers talk to eachother anyway?

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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I just took and passed SPCORE. The exam actually felt easier then ROUTE or SWITCH, because the scope is more limited. This might also be due to the fact that Idid a week long course, instead of group study. Next up, SPEDGE & SPADVROUTE.

Why does spedge sound like a bodily fluid?

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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psydude posted:

I've seen her on a bunch of Cisco Press and other vendor cert books.

She must have every certification in the world by now...

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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H.R. Paperstacks posted:

They have it in the CCNP-SP track now since MPLS is more a provider level technology than your standard Enterprise level.

I have my CCNP and am going for CCNP:SP. This means I can skip the SPROUTE exam, which is the only exam to actually have any ISIS on it. So, it is possible to get CCNP:SP without diving into ISIS.

e: Whoops, had a different discussion in my head about learning ISIS, not MPLS. You definately need to know MPLS for CCNP:SP.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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To ease your pain, a poem from Radia Perlman, inventor of Spanning Tree:

Algorhyme

I think that I shall never see
A graph more lovely than a tree.
A tree whose crucial property
Is loop-free connectivity.
A tree that must be sure to span
So packets can reach every LAN.
First, the root must be selected.
By ID, it is elected.
Least-cost paths from root are traced.
In the tree, these paths are placed.
A mesh is made by folks like me,
Then bridges find a spanning tree.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

Gothmog1065 posted:

Are there any good places to get practice with subnetting? Maybe have the question then have the answer worked through? I kind of get subnetting, but I need to practice it so I can get good.

This doesn't give you a step by step, but it will give you endless randomised subnetting questions : http://subnettingquestions.com

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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Spudalicious posted:

<redacted> was a great resource for me for some of the simulation questions: URL changed to explanation about dumps The questions aren't verbatim all the time but you'll definitely recognize some of the diagrams.

Braindumps are considered cheating here. If you already know the questions to the test going in, you are not tested on the knowledge in the field, you are only tested on the specific wording of that question. Also: if Cisco ever finds out, your CCNA will be voided plus you will get a ban from testing with Cisco again.

Methanar posted:

For the spanning tree bit is it just know that it sucks and that you should always use (802.1W) rpvst. Root bridge is determined by lowest mac by default, you can specify a certain device you want to be root, you can set different roots for different vlans as a load balancing measure, secondary bridges for backup. Then know the two different commands for actually doing it? I'm just not sure of the scale, depth or finickiness of the exam because I've never wrote a vendor exam before.

Alright I can figure out which links would be blocking too.

How is the exam administered then, do they sit me down infront of a program simulating a network with a list of things to do or is it paper based?

The exams are computer based. Cisco actually has the exact tutorial you get before every test online, so familiarize yourself with that. One point of note for Cisco exams, that is different from most other vendors' exams: there is no back button. Be especially weary of the for multipart questions, where you will have to answer all questions before hitting next.

e: The tutorial and the EULA don't count towards your time. Take this time to get yourself comfortable before you get going. You can also use this time to jot down some references, so you don't have to think about it during the test itself.

As to the knowledge level needed for CCNA: The hard part about the details you need to know, is that the level of explanation now is so shallow, you won't be getting the why behind the values. The why makes it a lot easier, but also require a lot more info to work with.

As for spanning-tree: Draw some random diagrams of switches and links, pick random port speeds between them and give every switch a random priority and mac*. Now go through and if you can answer which ports get which role, you know enough for the exam.
Make sure to mix link speeds to make everything more difficult though.

You dont have to go for the full 32 bit priority or 48 bit MAC address. If you just give them Prio "8", Mac: "1a", it will not change anything for the logic and calculations.

Jelmylicious fucked around with this message at 10:39 on Mar 21, 2015

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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Ahdinko posted:

Edit: gently caress me I found this linked on a cisco forum, is this for real?



I am working on my CCIE. I haven't taken the lab yet, so I can't attest to the actual topology on the Lab. That IPExpert topology is not as crazy as it looks at first glance. This is a wiring diagram, not the logical topology. Those are always more complicated than the actual logical drawing. Caveat: I haven't worked with IPExpert.
Let's break it down:
The ISP routers won't be under you control, they are to simulate multiple connections to the great big internet. You have multiple egress points to learn some traffic engineering. R21-25 are satellite offices
The area with R1 - R9 is your main corporate office. You have 4 switches to practice your L2 subjects and all routers are connected to the switches so you can make any combination of meshes between your routers. Just connecting two ports on a single VLAN will get you a point-to-point connection, multiple port in a VLAN can get you broadcast, private VLANs can give you point-to-multipoint, etc.
The other two areas are basically the same, with both switches acting as a psuedonode for all routers. So, yeah, it seems crazy at first, but it isn't so bad once you start putting the stuff together.

Anyway, best of luck on your journey to CCIE.

Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
Buy Dr. Quack's miracle juice! Now with patented H-twenty!

psydude posted:

If you pass the CCIE written and they refresh the exam before you take the lab, do you have to retake the new written version?

No. CCIE R&S recently got upgraded to version 5. If you passed the version 4 written, you can still take the version 5 lab. There is one caveat to that: once you pass your written, you have to do your first lab attempt within 18 months and actually pass the lab within 3 years, otherwise you have to redo the written.

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Jelmylicious
Dec 6, 2007
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Irritated Goat posted:

Mostly I'm just worried about subnetting and ospf. I'm just not 100% solid on those.

Keep going here until you do feel confident, because you will be tested on it thoroughly: http://subnettingquestions.com/

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